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Come across a closure common error described at Mozila developer network

it doesn't work as expected. No matter what field you focus on, the message about your age will be displayed.

function showHelp(help) {
  document.getElementById('help').innerHTML = help;
}

function setupHelp() {
  var helpText = [
      {'id': 'email', 'help': 'Your e-mail address'},
      {'id': 'name', 'help': 'Your full name'},
      {'id': 'age', 'help': 'Your age (you must be over 16)'}
    ];

  for (var i = 0; i < helpText.length; i++) {
    var item = helpText[i];
    document.getElementById(item.id).onfocus = function() {
      showHelp(item.help);
    }
  }
}

setupHelp();

It does give a solution. Which is add another closure.

function showHelp(help) {
  document.getElementById('help').innerHTML = help;
}

function makeHelpCallback(help) {
  return function() {
    showHelp(help);
  };
}

function setupHelp() {
  var helpText = [
      {'id': 'email', 'help': 'Your e-mail address'},
      {'id': 'name', 'help': 'Your full name'},
      {'id': 'age', 'help': 'Your age (you must be over 16)'}
    ];

  for (var i = 0; i < helpText.length; i++) {
    var item = helpText[i];
    document.getElementById(item.id).onfocus = makeHelpCallback(item.help);
  }
}

setupHelp(); 

The explaination given by MDN is because the 2nd solution created 3 environments.

Can anyone give me explaination, what does the phase 'enviroment' mean, and how can i tell its scope?

share|improve this question
    
Basically, the second closure gets the value of item as a function argument, which means the value is a local variable within the closure. Without that happening, the function gets item from the outer scope, where item is set to the last value stored in it after the completion of the for loop. – apsillers Jan 1 '13 at 21:51
    
cool.So passing the value in a function argument way is more like creating the snapshot of the current context scope? – ValidfroM Jan 1 '13 at 22:00
    
It takes a snapshot of the value of item.help, since JS passes arguments by value, and that "snapshot" is included in the handler function's outer scope. (Note: JS passes objects by reference-value, which is a discussion beyond the scope of this answer.) – apsillers Jan 1 '13 at 22:04
    
From the MDN page you cited: "The environment consists of any local variables that were in-scope at the time that the closure was created" – Will C. Jan 1 '13 at 22:35
up vote 3 down vote accepted

When you use a variable name in a function, first the JavaScript interpreter checks for that variable as a local variable within the function. If no such local variable exists, it then traverses up to the outer scope to find the variable. (When a function is defined, it gets access to a scope chain -- a hierarchy of scopes, starting with the scope of outer function where it is defined, and continuing on to the function that contains that function, etc.)

Here, the anonymous onfocus handler function uses the variable identifier item. item is not a local variable within the function, so when the handler is executed, JavaScript must traverse up the next outer scope, where it finds item as defined in setupHelp. You defined one handler function per item; however, all of those handler functions hold the same reference to item in the outer scope. Whenever any one of those functions is invoked, JavaScript looks up the same value for item, which is whatever value it held when the for loop completed.

In the case with an extra closure, you pass the current value of item.help as an argument to makeHelpCallback, which returns a handler function. Since JavaScript passes variables by value, each of those handler functions now has a separate outer scope with a different value of help.

share|improve this answer

Consider a much simpler example:

for (var i = 0; i < 10; ++i) {
    document.getElementById('elem' + i).addEventListener('click', function() {
        document.getElementById('elem' + i).style.display = 'none';
    });
}

Code looks simple enough, right? It looks like if you click a div it will hidden.

That's not what happens though. The event handler is closed around i. Whatever happens to i outside of the handler happens to i inside of the handler (to simplify things a bit).

Here is an example of this behavior. Note how no matter what div you click on, ELEM #10 is always the one hidden. (It's 10 instead of 9 since i was incremented one last time before the loop condition failed.)


A tempting fix is to try this:

for (var i = 0; i < 10; ++i) {
    document.getElementById('elem' + i).addEventListener('click', function() {
        var fix = i;
        document.getElementById('elem' + fix).style.display = 'none';
    });
}​

That doesn't work though since the assignment isn't processed until i is already 10. (Well, technically it isn't processed until the click event happens -- it's assumed that i is 10 then, though theoretically the click could happen before all of the events are bound, leaving i lower than 10 at the time.)


You can actually do the trick MDN used inline:

for (var i = 0; i < 10; ++i) {
    document.getElementById('elem' + i).addEventListener('click', (function(j) { return function() {
        document.getElementById('elem' + j).style.display = 'none';
    }}(i)));
}​

Passing a variable to a function makes it considered a different 'environment' of sorts. The j inside of the function is frozen at the time the function was called. The inner closure then uses that j. Interestingly, i still exists inside of both of those functions. Depending on when it was accessed, it would be somewhere between 0 and 10.

for (var i = 0; i < 10; ++i) {
    document.getElementById('elem' + i).addEventListener('click', (function(j) { 
        alert(i); //whichever value is being bound
        //note that i === j is always true here
        //j is a copy of i though and thus stops changing when i changes in the future 
        return function() {
            alert(i); //always 10
            document.getElementById('elem' + j).style.display = 'none';
        };
    }(i)));
}​

A simplified way to think of JS scoping is that nested functions inherit parent scopes (which is true). When functions are called, the variables are passed as they are in the calling scope.

There's an interesting little caveat here that primitives are passed by value and objects by reference.

var x = 5; (function(n) { ++n; }(x)); /* x is still 5 */
var o = {foo: 'bar'}; (function(obj) { obj.far = 'baz'; }(o)); /* o === {foo: 'bar', far: 'baz'} */ 
share|improve this answer
    
+1, very good answer. However, I'd add that in order for it to true that "theoretically the click could happen before all of the events are bound" the browser would have to 1) support multi-threaded execution (since the handler can't run until the loop finishes) and 2) not allow JS to block UI operations (since, as it stands, a click can't happen while the loop is running). It might be possible if you had a debugger breakpoint or possibly some other thread interrupt, like an alert. Anyway, I'm sure you're aware of all this (again, good answer); I say this primarily for the OP's benefit. – apsillers Jan 1 '13 at 22:33
    
@apsillers I actually considered putting something along those lines but figured that I might as well keep it simple. (Basically I was too lazy to type it out :).) (I'm actually quite curious now if the standard is worded in a way such that JS basically has to be single threaded [at least in script-land]. 99% sure that's the case, which means my 'theoretically' note is basically moot.) – Corbin Jan 1 '13 at 22:43

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