Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Using the JS replace function with regex, and will have dozens of replace statements.

var NewHTML = OriginalHTML
.replace(/\bJavaScript\b/gi, "<a href=\"http://js.com/\">$&</a>")
.replace(/\bMySQL\b/gi, "<a href=\"http://www.mysql.com/\">$&</a>")
;

To make it more readable and more manageable (i.e. easier to change the regex pattern or flags by changing it in one place instead of on every line), trying to pull the replace regex condition and replace flags out into a separate variable:

var pattern = /\b(?!\-)(?!\/)\b(?!\-)/gi;

var NewHTML = OriginalHTML
.replace("JavaScript", "<a href=\"http://js.com/\">$&</a>", pattern)
.replace("MySQL", "<a href=\"http://www.mysql.com/\">$&</a>", pattern)    

Problem is, the inline call is being completely ignored... both the regex portion and the flags portion.

Can anyone spot what's wrong with the JS replace call or declaration of the regex/flags variable? :-)

Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
It's not really clear what it is you're trying to change, or why. – Pointy Jan 1 '13 at 22:08
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I would use a lookup object to map the originals to URLs:

// Original string
var o = "MySql is a DBMS, whereas javascript is a client side scripting language";

//Patterns
var patterns = {
    "javascript": "http://js.com/",
    "mysql": "http://www.mysql.com/"
};

//Constructing regex
RegExp.escape= function(s) {
    return s.replace(/[-\/\\^$*+?.()|[\]{}]/g, '\\$&')
};
var keys = [];
for (i in patterns) {
    if (patterns.hasOwnProperty(i)) {
        keys.push(RegExp.escape(i));
    }
}
var pattern = new RegExp("\\b(" + keys.join("|") + ")\\b", "gi");

//Replace
var n = o.replace(pattern, function(m, g1) {
    return "<a href='" + patterns[g1.toLowerCase()] + "'>" + g1 + "< /a>";
});
console.log(n);

Here is a demonstration: http://jsfiddle.net/qP9Er/


EDIT:

As per your request, here is a version that replaces the first n occurrences. You can find a demonstration here:

// Original string
var o = '<p>Test 1 (JavaScript - <strong>1st keyword instance to be replaced</strong>): <br><a href="http://js1.net">Link to JavaScript site (existing URL)</a> is a scripting language commonly implemented as part of a web browser in order to create enhanced user interfaces and dynamic websites. JavaScript is very flexible.</p><p>more text here... and another mention of JavaScript. also javascript and JAVAScrIPT <br><br></p><p>Test 2 (MySQL - <strong>1st keyword instance to be replaced</strong>): <br><a href="http://www.mysql.com">MySQL</a>  (existing URL) is the most popular open-source database system.</p> <p><a href="http://www.themysqllink.com">link to a MySQL site</a> (existing URL).</p><p> More stuff about Mysql, also mysql and mySQL</p>';

//Patterns
var patterns = {
    "javascript": "http://js.com/",
    "mysql": "http://www.mysql.com/",
    "mention": "http://www.x.com/"
};

//Number of replacements
var num = 1;

//Constructing regex
RegExp.escape = function(s) {
    return s.replace(/[-\/\\^$*+?.()|[\]{}]/g, '\\$&');
};
var keys = [];
for (key in patterns) {
    if (patterns.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
        keys.push(RegExp.escape(key));
    }
}
var regexen = [];
for (var i = 0; i < keys.length; i++) {
    regexen[i] = new RegExp("\\b(" + keys[i] + ")\\b(?![^<]*?<\/a>)", "i");
}

//Replace
for (var i = 0; i < regexen.length; i++) {
    var count = 0;
    var pattern = regexen[i];
    while (count < num) {
        o = o.replace(pattern, function(m, g1) {
            return "<a href='" + patterns[g1.toLowerCase()] + "'>" + g1 + "</a>";
        });
        count++;
    }
}
document.write(o);
share|improve this answer
    
agreed, this approach is very clean, much more manageable, thank you.But it's not working for me? here's the jsfiddle: jsfiddle.net/dbaritchi/AD5TU -- Thx!! – Dan Jan 1 '13 at 22:19
    
@Dan I made a couple mistakes, I'm debugging them now. Will update my answer. – Asad Saeeduddin Jan 1 '13 at 22:21
    
@Dan I've updated my answer. – Asad Saeeduddin Jan 1 '13 at 22:28
    
awesome, thanks SO much, this works perfectly and is far more elegant and maintainable! :-) – Dan Jan 1 '13 at 22:36
1  
@Dan I've updated the answer with a version that replaces the first n occurrences of each key. – Asad Saeeduddin Jan 3 '13 at 17:39

The .replace() function only takes 2 arguments.

You can build a regex dynamically by building it as a string and then passing it to the RegExp() constructor.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry but you are wrong about the replace params: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/JavaScript/Reference/… But you are right about the use of RegExp constructor. – Gabriel Gartz Jan 1 '13 at 22:11
    
@GabrielGartz that's Firefox-only as far as I know. The standard only has 2 arguments. And in any case he's passing the pattern as the third argument, which even in Firefox won't work. – Pointy Jan 1 '13 at 22:12
    
@Pointy thanks for the reply. I'm confused, thought it took three arguments? See here: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/JavaScript/Reference/… at the top, and the example of this further down, screenshot: screencast.com/t/5PhceR0RhF – Dan Jan 1 '13 at 22:13
    
@Dan see where it says "Non-standard"? That usually should be read as, "DO NOT USE" :=) In any case, you're passing the regexp object, while what that parameter should be is a string containing the flags. That documentation page is badly worded; I'll fix it. – Pointy Jan 1 '13 at 22:15
    
@Pointy you are wrong again dude, that specification was made in Javascript 1.2 / ECMAScript 3 standart, that is accept by any moddern browser. The prototypes from ECMAScript 6 that almost only works in mozzila, because they are still in draft work. – Gabriel Gartz Jan 1 '13 at 22:20

The flags parameter is nonstandard. And more importantly, it only tags flags such as "gi" and not a whole regular expression.

I would write a loop to deal with the duplication. Or have a function create the String so I can keep it in once place.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.