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I will try to explain my question on an example:

class V<T>
{
    public readonly Func<T> Get;
    public readonly bool IsConstant;

    V(Func<T> get, bool isConstant)
    {
        Get = get;
        IsConstant = isConstant;
    }

    public static implicit operator V<T>(T value)
    {
        return new V<T>(() => value, true);
    }

    public static implicit operator V<T>(Func<T> getter)
    {
        return new V<T>(getter, false);
    }
}

void DoSomething<T>(V<T> v)
{
    //...
}

void Main()
{
    DoSomething<string>("test"); // (1) type inference is not working
    DoSomething<string>((V<string>)(() => "test")); // (2) implicit operator does not work
}

In the method Main, I have two situations:

  1. I have to explicitly specify the generic argument <string> to the method DoSomething.
  2. Here, I have to add the explicit cast (V<string>), the implicit operator does not seem to work.

Why is this required? What the alternatives that the compiler is considering, so it cannot choose the correct way?

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My guesses: (1) the compiler won't do implicit casts until it knows the type to cast to, and <string> is necessary for that. (2) the lambda expression doesn't have a specific delegate type like Func<T>, the compiler doesn't see the potential implicit cast. –  Strilanc Jan 1 '13 at 23:14
    
(1) Ok. (2) You are right, casting to (Func<string>) is enough. Put it as an answer:) –  TN. Jan 1 '13 at 23:19
    
Main doesn't call DoSoemthing; it calls some other method DumpValue. –  Eric Lippert Jan 2 '13 at 1:17
    
Thx, I fixed the code. –  TN. Jan 2 '13 at 15:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your second question is why the implicit conversion from ()=>"" to V<string> does not succeed, even though ()=>"" is convertible to Func<string> and Func<string> is convertible to V<string>.

Again, I do not know how to answer "why not?" questions but I do know how to answer the question "what line of the specification indicates that the compiler ought to reject this code?" The relevant line is:

First, if required, performing a standard conversion from the source type to the operand type of the user-defined or lifted conversion operator.

Note that there is a small error here; this should say performing a standard conversion from the source expression. The source expression may not have a type. I believe I gave that note to the spec maintainer before I left the team, so hopefully this will get fixed in the next edition.

Anyway, it should now be clear what is going on here. There is no standard conversion from a lambda to a delegate type, and therefore the user-defined conversion is classified as inapplicable by the conversion resolution algorithm.

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Thank you for both answers. –  TN. Jan 2 '13 at 15:27

I assume that your code intended to call DoSomething, not DumpValue.

Your question is, first, why does

DoSomething("");

not infer that the call is intended to be

DoSomething<string>((V<string>)"");

correct?

"Why" questions are very difficult to answer, and "why not?" questions are even harder. Instead, I'll answer a question that can be answered: what line of the specification justifies this behaviour?

Overload resolution works like this: if the method group contains a generic method but no generic method type arguments were provided then type inference attempts to infer the type arguments. If type arguments cannot be inferred then the method is removed from consideration for overload resolution. In your case, since there is only one method in the method group, removing it will cause overload resolution to fail.

Why then does type inference fail? T cannot be inferred because the controlling line of the specification is:

if V is a constructed type C<V1…Vk> and there is a unique set of types U1…Uk such that a standard implicit conversion exists from U to C<U1…Uk> then an exact inference is made from each Ui for the corresponding Vi.

There is no standard implicit conversion from string to V<string>. That is a user-defined implicit conversion.

Therefore type inference fails.

I'll answer your second question in a second answer. In general it is a bad idea to ask two questions in one. Post two questions when you have two questions.

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Sorry for "why" questions:) Being a really lazy programmer, I prefer DRY. And therefore, if I have to say something explicitly, I would like to know the reasons:) –  TN. Jan 2 '13 at 15:25

I know your question was "why type inference isn't working", but I just thought that I'd address your statement at the end about the 2 alternatives. In this case, I believe a better alternative to the implicit conversion (eww do I hate those) is a static factory method. IMO, the syntax will be better when you call DumpValue.

static class VFactory
{
    public static V<T> Create<T>(T value)
    {
        return new V<T>(() => value, true);
    }

    public static V<T> Create<T>(Func<T> getter)
    {
        return new V<T>(getter, false);
    }
}

class V<T>
{
    public readonly Func<T> Get;
    public readonly bool IsConstant;

    internal V(Func<T> get, bool isConstant)
    {
        Get = get;
        IsConstant = isConstant;
    }
}

void DumpValue<T>(V<T> v)
{
    //...
}

void Main()
{
    DumpValue(VFactory.Create("test"));
    DumpValue(VFactory.Create(() => "test"));
}
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