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I've run into a situation where a function fails to type-check unless I explicitly add a forall to the beginning of its type signature.

The function in question is:

test :: (Typeable a) => a -> a
test x 
    | typeOf (undefined :: a) == typeOf (undefined :: a) = x
    | otherwise = x

GHC gives the following warnings on the above:

  Ambiguous type variable `a0' in the constraint:
  (Typeable a0) arising from a use of `typeOf'
Probable fix: add a type signature that fixes these type variable(s)
In the first argument of `(==)', namely `typeOf (undefined :: a)'
In the expression:
  typeOf (undefined :: a) == typeOf (undefined :: a)
In a stmt of a pattern guard for
               an equation for `test':
  typeOf (undefined :: a) == typeOf (undefined :: a)

Ambiguous type variable `a1' in the constraint:
  (Typeable a1) arising from a use of `typeOf'
Probable fix: add a type signature that fixes these type variable(s)
In the second argument of `(==)', namely `typeOf (undefined :: a)'
In the expression:
  typeOf (undefined :: a) == typeOf (undefined :: a)
In a stmt of a pattern guard for
               an equation for `test':
  typeOf (undefined :: a) == typeOf (undefined :: a)

So it's failing to unify the two types of the undefined values. However if I add a forall a to the front:

test :: forall a. (Typeable a) => a -> a
test x 
    | typeOf (undefined :: a) == typeOf (undefined :: a) = x
    | otherwise = x

It compiles fine. This is in GHC 7.4.2 using

{-# LANGUAGE GADTs, StandaloneDeriving, DeriveDataTypeable,
ScopedTypeVariables, FlexibleInstances, UndecidableInstances,
Rank2Types #-}

I was under the impression that omitting "forall" in a type signature was equivalent to implicitly appending foralls to the beginning over all relevant type variables (as suggested in the GHC docs: http://www.haskell.org/ghc/docs/7.4.2/html/users_guide/other-type-extensions.html). Why does the first code fragment not type-check, while the second does?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The ScopedTypeVariables extension adds semantic value to top-level forall quantifiers. It is what provides the scoping for the type variable over the body of the binding.

Without that forall, the type variable a on line 3 is a different type variable than the a on line 1. The error message indicates this by labeling them a0 and a1. Without those being the same type, the type on line 3 is ambiguous, because it is completely unconstrained.

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1  
    
Thanks both of you, this makes sense. I was confused because thanks to ScopedTypeVariables I'd been using similar constructs inside of class declarations without trouble; that documentation explains that this is because class declarations bring type variables into scope just like forall does in this case. –  Corey Staten Jan 2 '13 at 0:22

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