Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been trying to write something that will let me easily manage OpenGL using classes.

I took an approach of having a Drawable class [which shapes/etc would inherit from, and override a draw function], and then using a Controller class to iterate through a table of Drawable classes and draw them all. The only issue that I've noticed that the draw() method is being called from the Drawable class, instead of the Rectangle class. ??

    class Drawable {
        public:
            void draw();
    };
    class Rectangle : public Drawable {
        public:
            void draw();
    };
    class Controller {
        public:
            Drawable ents[200];
            int ent_count;
            void frame();
            void append(Drawable item); // this will add an object onto the list
            Controller();
    };
    void Drawable::draw() {
        // this is the default drawing function, which should be overridden
    }
    void Rectangle::draw() {
        // gl functions here
    }
    void Controller::frame() {
        for(int i=0;i<ent_count,i++) {
            ents[i].draw(); // draw all entities on the list
        }
        // here, a timer would loop back the frame() function
    }
    void Controller::append(Drawable item) {
         ents[ent_count++]=item;
    }
    int main(void) {
         Controller main_controller; // create a controller
         Rectangle rect; // create a rectangle
         main_controller.append(rect); // insert rectangle into controller list
         main_controller.frame(); // start the frame loop
    }

[if there are minor typing errors in that, it is because it was written as a summary of the method.] This method that I've tried to use has not been very successful, and I'm pretty sure it has to do with inheritance. Any ideas? Entire source code:

#include <iostream>
#include <GL/glfw.h>
#include <GL/gl.h>
class Drawable {
      public:
             int x,y;
             void draw();
             void frame();
             void create();
             void destroy(); 
};
void Drawable::create() {

}
void Drawable::draw() {
}
class Rectangle : public Drawable {
      public:
      int w,h;
      unsigned short r,g,b;
      Rectangle(int x,int y, int w, int h, unsigned short r, unsigned short g, unsigned short b);
      void draw();
};
void Rectangle::draw() {
     glColor3ub(r,g,b);
     glBegin(GL_QUADS);
     glVertex2i(x,y);
     glVertex2i(x+w,y);
     glVertex2i(x+w,y+h);
     glVertex2i(x,y+h);
     glEnd();
}
Rectangle::Rectangle(int x,int y, int w, int h, unsigned short r, unsigned short g, unsigned short b) {
                         this->x=x;
                         this->y=y;
                         this->w=w;
                         this->r=r;
                         this->g=g;
                         this->b=b;
}
class Controller {
public:
       Controller(int w,int h,int fsaa,bool fs,bool vsync,const char* title);
       bool running;
       int frame_limit;
       Drawable entity[200];
       int entity_count;
       void fev();
       void begin();
       void bind();
       void append(Drawable item);
      };
Controller::Controller(int w,int h,int fsaa,bool fs,bool vsync,const char* title) {
                          int fullscreen= (fs ? GLFW_FULLSCREEN : GLFW_WINDOW);
                          bool window=glfwOpenWindow(w,h,0,0,0,0,10,10,fullscreen);
                          glfwSetWindowTitle(title);
                          frame_limit=120;
                          entity_count=0;
                          std::cout << (window ? "Successfully initialized a window.\n" : "Error initializing window!\n");
       }
void Controller::begin() {
     glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION);
     glLoadIdentity();
     glOrtho(0,640,480,0,0,5);
     glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW);
     glLoadIdentity();
     glClearColor(0.4f,0.4f,0.4f,1.0f);
     running=true;
     fev();
}
void Controller::append(Drawable item) {
     entity[entity_count++]=item;
}
void Controller::fev() {
     glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT);
     for (int i=0;i<entity_count;++i) {
          entity[i].draw();
          }
     glfwSwapBuffers();
     if (frame_limit>0) {
        glfwSleep(1000/frame_limit*0.001);
     }
     if (running) {
        if (glfwGetKey(GLFW_KEY_ESC) || !glfwGetWindowParam(GLFW_OPENED)) {
           running=false;
        }
        fev();
     } else {
       std::cout << "terminated!";
}
}
int main(void) {
    glfwInit();
    Controller main(640,480,0,false,false,"WindTitle");
    Rectangle rect(50,50,50,50,50,50,50);
    main.append(rect);
    main.begin();
}
share|improve this question
    
You might want to consider looking at existing C++ wrappers, like OGLplus: oglplus.org –  paulsm4 Jan 2 '13 at 0:21
1  
As a note, remember that OpenGL is a finite state machine. So you will have to make sure all of your class methods/classes leave that machine in what you consider a "safe" state (or "expected" state) –  RageD Jan 2 '13 at 0:22
    
Try making draw() virtual. –  ValekHalfHeart Jan 2 '13 at 0:24
    
It had no effect when I made the draw() virtual both in Rectangle and in Drawable. –  object Jan 2 '13 at 0:25
1  
And a helpful tip: Please don't use raw arrays, use std::vector. It will make your life much easier in the long run, –  Joachim Pileborg Jan 2 '13 at 0:27
show 5 more comments

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As others have mentioned, it would be best to try to use some of the existing wrappers.

That said, you need to use pointers for your list of entities. You are having issues with slicing.

As some of the comments mentioned, you need to make Drawable::draw() virtual so calling draw() on a Drawable will call through to the child implementation. That said, because you are adding your Drawables to a an list of objects, instead of a list of pointers to objects, the objects are being sliced. This means that they are being converted from the child type back into Drawable objects, removing the extra information about specific types.

So instead of this:

Drawable ents[200];

You should do something like this:

std::vector<Drawable*> ents;

or if you have C++11 or Boost:

std::vector<std::shared_ptr<Drawable>> ents;

And your append method would take a reference.

void Controller::append(Drawable &item) {
     ents[ent_count++] = &item;
}

or

void Controller::append(Drawable &item) {
  ents.push_back(&item);
}

or

void Controller::append(std::shared_ptr<Drawable> item) {
  ents.push_back(item);
}

And your render loop would be like this:

for (int i = 0; i < ents.size(); ++i) {
  ents[i]->draw();
}

This loop could also be cleaned up to use iterator.

share|improve this answer
    
If you have Boost then vector_ptr may be a better tool for the job –  K-ballo Jan 2 '13 at 0:40
    
@metredigm I added some examples, are those helpful? –  loganfsmyth Jan 2 '13 at 0:48
    
This answer is good considering the question. However, as others mentioned it is better to look into packages like OPGLplus before trying to wrap OpenGL into an OOP interface. –  meyumer Jan 2 '13 at 0:49
    
@meyumer Agreed. –  loganfsmyth Jan 2 '13 at 0:50
    
Thank you! The drawing function in Rectangle is now being called, now I just need to fix my rectangle vertices.. [fixed, i forgot to define the height in the Rectangle constructor.] –  object Jan 2 '13 at 0:51
add comment

I've been trying to write something that will let me easily manage OpenGL using classes.

Newbies often try this. But OpenGL really doesn't translate well into OOP. The problem is, that it's a finite state machine and to map properly to OOP you'd have to to a lot of state tracking between the different classes and instances.

I myself tried at least 3 times to abstract OpenGL into a OOP scheme. It always broke in some way.

Which is not to say that you can not use OOP with OpenGL. You can't just map OpenGL concepts 1:1 into classes.


Regarding your actual problem: Use virtual functions.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm afraid this answer is focusing too much on a different matter and missing the main root of the problem. Even though there is much to talk about whether an OO approach to OpenGL is feasible or a good idea. –  E_net4 Jan 2 '13 at 0:46
    
Wouldn't it be space-consuming to write complex games/other graphical applications without a sort of base-engine like this? It'd be very difficult to manage dynamic objects, and the code would get very long, and very cluttered. –  object Jan 2 '13 at 0:50
    
@metredigm There are plenty of game and graphics libraries out there that you can use without making your own. But they all usually create a full layer of abstraction over OpenGL, rather than making an OO version of it. –  E_net4 Jan 2 '13 at 0:54
1  
True, but I like to make my own things, even if they are inefficient. I just find it fun to try and tackle things like this. –  object Jan 2 '13 at 0:58
    
@metredigm: Of course most game engines are written in C++ and make heavy use of classes. But the render pipelines are surprisingly flat normally. I recommend looking at the Doom3 source code. –  datenwolf Jan 2 '13 at 1:05
add comment

You might want to have a look at Coin3D. It is a large rich set of C++ class wrappers around OpenGL. You clould either look at how they do things of just use it. There are libraries for integration with various windowing systems (Qt, Windows, Cocoa, ...).

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.