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I need to call a CUDA C function foo() (residing in gpu.cu) from within a pure C function main() (residing in main.c). My attempt at this is illustrated below:

  • main.c (caller):

    #include "gpu.h"
    int main();
    int main() { foo(); }
    
  • gpu.h (foo() declaration): <--- problem here

    extern void foo();
    
  • gpu.cu (foo() definition):

    #include "gpu.h"
    extern "C" void foo() { ... }
    
  • I get the error:

    gpu.cu(2): error: linkage specification is incompatible with previous "foo"
    gpu.h(1): here
    

However, without using header files the following does work:

  • main.c (caller):

    void foo();
    int main();
    int main() { foo(); }
    
  • gpu.cu (foo() declaration and definition):

    extern "C" void foo();
    extern "C" void foo() { ... }
    

Of course, I would prefer using a single header file across both pure C and CUDA c code, so what is the correct syntax to use in the header file (do we still need extern "C" even though it's a C++ thing)? Do I need a .cuh extension?

I am compiling and linking using NVCC only (i.e. for both pure-C and CUDA-C code).

Many thanks.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You almost have this correct - the problem is in how you are using gpu.h. The conflict reported by the toolchain is happening because the header file included in gpu.cu declares that foo() will have C++ linkage, but then the definition has C linkage.

The basic problem is that you are trying to use gpu.h as both a C and C++ header. This is usually not a good idea, but it can be made to work. One approach is to decide that it is a C header file and modify the C++ code to treat it as one, so in gpu.cu do this:

extern "C" {
#include "gpu.h"
}

extern "C" void foo() { ... };

The other would be to modify gpu.h so that its behaviour is different depending on whether it is being included by a C compiler or a C++ compiler, so something like:

#ifdef __cplusplus
extern "C" {
#endif
extern void foo();
#ifdef __cplusplus
}
#endif

or

#ifdef __cplusplus
extern "C" void foo();
#else
void foo();
#endif

would make the preprocessor emit different code depending on whether the code is being compiled in a C or C++ environment. This may, however, fail if you try and compile any of your notionally C code using a C++ compiler.

How you choose to fix this will probably depend heavily on the real structure of your code, which I am guessing is not as simple as you have described.

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