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I'm having trouble with an or condition in a function. The if statement keeps evaluating as True no matter what value choice is. When I remove the or, the if works correctly.

def chooseDim ():
    **choice = input ('Do you need to find radius or area? ')
    if choice == 'A' or 'a':**
        area = 0
        area = int(area)
        areaSol ()

    elif choice == 'R' or 'r':

        radSol ()

    else:
        print ('Please enter either A/a or R/r.')
        chooseDim ()
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2  
This gets asked every few hours. or conjoins complete conditions, not individual options within a condition. It's not "magical" in that way. This actually stems from a common error in English: it's "either choice is 'A' or choice is 'a'", not "either choice is 'A' or 'a'". Moving "either" would fix it but that's not how it works in most programming languages. :) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 2 '13 at 1:06
1  
@LightnessRacesinOrbit I was with you until you called it an error in English. Citation needed. –  kojiro Jan 2 '13 at 1:14
    
@kojiro: *shrug* I'm a native speaker who's never wrong about anything. How's that? :) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 2 '13 at 1:31
1  
@LightnessRacesinOrbit better than most StackOverflow answers, I guess. –  kojiro Jan 2 '13 at 2:09
    
Thanks for the clarification. I used an "in" to correct it. It works fine now. –  Fluxcapacitor Jan 2 '13 at 2:30

4 Answers 4

The answers about or itself are correct. You're literally asking if "a" is True, which it always is. But there's an alternative approach:

if choice in 'Aa':

Then again, there's nothing wrong with:

if choice.lower() == 'a':
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That's actually an approach I've never seen used before - most (including me) go with the standard list, not a string. –  Volatility Jan 2 '13 at 1:13
    
@Volatility Yeah, I instinctively went with a tuple at first, then I realized I was manufacturing an outer immutable iterable to house two single-element internal immutable iterables. That just didn't seem right. :) –  kojiro Jan 2 '13 at 1:15

'a' evaluates to True, so you need to construct your if statement correctly.

def chooseDim ( ):
**choice = input ('Do you need to find radius or area? ')
if choice == 'A' or choice == 'a':**
    area = 0
    area = int(area)
    areaSol ( )

elif choice == 'R' or choice == 'r':

    radSol ( )

else:
    print ('Please enter either A/a or R/r.')
    chooseDim ( )
share|improve this answer

It would be easier to just use the in operator in this case:

if choice in ['A', 'a']: ...
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if choice == 'A' or choice =='a':
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