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Just as we can delete (or substitute, or yank, etc.) the 4th to 6th lines from the beginning of a file in vim:

:4,6d 

I'd like to delete (or substitute, or yank, etc.) the 4th last to the 6th lines from the end of a file. It means, if the file has 15 lines, I'd do:

:10,12d

But one can't do this when they don't know how many lines are in the files -- and I'm going to use it on a batch of many files. How do I do this in vim and sed?

I did in fact look at this post, but have not found it useful.

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5 Answers 5

Well, using vim you can try the following -- which goes quite intuitive, anyway:

:$-4,$-5d

Now, using sed I couldn't find an exact way to do it, but if you can use something other than sed, here goes a solution with head and tail:

head -n -4 file.txt && tail -2 file.txt
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Thank you. So how would I do a substitution using the head and tail, the way I usually do in sed and vim ? –  user1271772 Jan 24 '13 at 21:47
    
tail -6 file.txt| head -2 | sed -e '...' Note that the syntax for sed and vim s commands are a little different. You may be better off saving the file using > and then opening it with vim. –  Forethinker Mar 26 '13 at 2:34
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In Vim, you can subtract the line numbers from $, which stands for the last line, e.g. this will work on the last 3 lines:

:$-2,$substitute/...

In sed, this is not so easy, because it works on the stream of characters, and cannot simply go back. You would have to store a number of last seen lines in the hold space, and at the end of the stream work on the hold space. Here are some recipes from sed1line.txt:

# print the last 10 lines of a file (emulates "tail")
sed -e :a -e '$q;N;11,$D;ba'

# print the last 2 lines of a file (emulates "tail -2")
sed '$!N;$!D'

# delete the last 2 lines of a file
sed 'N;$!P;$!D;$d'

# delete the last 10 lines of a file
sed -e :a -e '$d;N;2,10ba' -e 'P;D'   # method 1
sed -n -e :a -e '1,10!{P;N;D;};N;ba'  # method 2
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From the 4th last to the 6th lines from the end of a file: use tac to reverse the file

tac filename | sed 4,6d | tac
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This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed -r ':a;${s/([^\n]*\n){3}//;q};N;7,$!ba;P;D' file

This works by making a moving window of 6 lines in the pattern space (PS) and then deleting the first three of them on encountering the last line.

  • :a is a loop label
  • ${s/([^\n]*\n){3}//;q} delete the first three lines of the PS at end of file and quit.
  • N append a newline and then the next line to the PS.
  • 7,$!ba' if not lines 7 to the $ (end-of file) that is lines 1 to 6, loop back to beginning i.e. label :a
  • P;D for the line range 7 to $ (end-of-file) print upto the first newline in the PS and then delete upto and including the first newline and begin a new cycle.

The second to last clause creates the window by default in that the lines 1 to 6 are appended into the PS. From line 7 to the end a line is added at the end and the first line is printed then deleted.

Alternatively:

sed -e ':a' -e '$s/\([^\n]*\n\)\{3\}//' -e '$q' -e 'N' -e '7,$!ba' -e 'P' -e 'D' file
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You can use 2 passes with awk, first pass to count the number of lines and the second to print or delete whatever lines you like, e.g.

awk 'NR==FNR{numLines++;next} {fromEnd = numLines - FNR} fromEnd > 6 || fromEnd < 4' file file

awk 'NR==FNR{numLines++;next} {fromEnd = numLines - FNR} fromEnd < 6 && fromEnd > 4' file file
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