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Solution: Python computes the value of the variable when set, and the variable is merely a pointer. I would say the first option is better for clarity, since the only difference in runtime is how long Python takes to convert to binary store the values - minimal.

My thanks to all who replied.

In a module am writing, I need to define a LOT of constants for simple on/off switches. This is obviously done easily as a binary string, but when I define the constnts, which method below has less impact on runtime speed and memory use at runtime.

one:

THIS_VAR_0 = 2**0
THIS_VAR_1 = 2**1
.
.
.
This_Var_N = 2**N

or, two:

THIS_VAR_0 = 0
THIS_VAR_1 = 1
.
.
.
This_Var_N = 536870912 # 2**30

EDIT: They do not NEED to be calculated more than once. While python might not have a native read only constants, I am writing this section of code to use these like constants. (same idea as the wx.ID_ANY, and wx.DEFAULT_FRAME type things)

Another way to put this, is: Are the calculations done when the variable is first encountered (set) and then a pointer used for lookup, or is the pointer pointing to the formula and the formula is calculated on every following encounter of the variable?

Note: I need this info based on Python 2.7, but a response (if it's not the same), for Python 3.X would also be appreciated. If your response applies only to either 2 or 3, please say so. (I haven't delved into 3 yet but plan on it so future use knowledge is good too ;-)

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2  
time it to find out. or maybe I should say timeit. –  GregS Jan 2 '13 at 3:39
    
@ GregS Most of my code is only partially written, or I would have tried that first. Also, I don't know of any benchmarking apps for python. Care to suggest one? –  Jase Jan 2 '13 at 3:46
2  
I left you a hint. The python module "timeit" can be used. See this for an example. –  GregS Jan 2 '13 at 3:48
1  
@GregS is indeed suggesting timeit: docs.python.org/2/library/timeit.html –  Raj Jan 2 '13 at 3:49
    
@GregS : ROFL I didn't know that was a module THANK YOU! And you Raj for pointing it out! –  Jase Jan 2 '13 at 3:50

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Python computes the value of the variable when set, and the variable is merely a pointer. I would say the first option is better for clarity, since the only difference in runtime is how long Python takes to convert to binary store the values - minimal.

This is general Python, btw.

Also, you say you need to define A LOT of constants, so why not just use a for loop and a dict:

THIS_VAR = {}
for i in range(n):
    THIS_VAR[i] = 2 ** i

Then you can just access the values through THIS_VAR[i]. It's much quicker than defining every constant manually.

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Yes, this is VERY basic python, but somewhere along the line i mssed the part about about how much impact on runtime the different methods of declaration have. And my google-fu seems to be failing me tonight. On the other hand, I've only been coding Python for a couple months, and this site has been a god send. I think it is quite possible that a lot of NEW programmers wind up directed here via google, so having ultra basic questions here isn't really a bad thing (unless I've missed something in the TOU) –  Jase Jan 2 '13 at 3:43
    
Reason for not using a loop (which I wish I could) is that many (almost half, at least in the 38-42 % range)of the constants are either-or-or-or constructs requiring 2 bits (and one so far that uses 3). That complication is what steered my away from the dictionary concept as well. –  Jase Jan 2 '13 at 3:54

They'll only be evaluated once either way unless you reset them. You'll pay a one time hit for the math if you do it with evaluation, but after the first read they'll be identical.

You could replace them with lambdas if you really want them to be evaluated each time, but you'll have to call them with braces:

pi = lambda : 3.14159265359
two_pi = lambda : 2 * pi()

around = two_pi() * r # note braces

FWIW Python doesn't have a native way to create read-only variables, so 'constants' here is a convention not a basic truth.

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good point to remember....question edited to reflect –  Jase Jan 2 '13 at 3:55
    
By the way, I would love to upvote you on this about ten times. I have been unable to wrap my head around the lambda function no matter how hard i've tried for weeks now. This one simple example provided by you has finally made it make sense. a="THANK YOU"; PRINT a*100**100**100 :-) –  Jase Jan 2 '13 at 4:37
    
those are 'no argument' lambdas, there are also ones with arguments: for example lowcase = lambda s: s.lower() # lower case of a string mod = lambda num, divisor: num % divisor # two arguments ... no good way to format in comments though :) –  theodox Jan 2 '13 at 5:22

Python does constant folding.

>>> import dis
>>> def function():
...     return 2**21
... 
>>> dis.disassemble(function.__code__)
  2           0 LOAD_CONST               3 (2097152) 
              3 RETURN_VALUE         

Once the module is compiled, there will be no difference whatsoever between 2**21 and 2097152.

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The slightly more efficient than ** or pow() could be using the << operator. Then your code can be replaced by:

THIS_VAR_0 = 1<<0             # equal to 2**0; actually, it is 1
THIS_VAR_1 = 1<<1             # 2 
...
This_Var_N = 1<<N             # 2**N

The doc for Python 3 says:

A left shift by n bits is equivalent to multiplication by pow(2, n) without overflow check.

For Python 2.7 the same section of the doc says:

A left shift by n bits is equivalent to multiplication by pow(2, n). A long integer is returned if the result exceeds the range of plain integers.

... i.e. it does not mention the overflow check. Anyway, it produces the same results for both versions of Python.

The shift operator is more natural for defining constants like that in the C-family languages. The operation is very fast one for native integers of the processor. Anyway, it is quite usual to use also the case with explicit numbers which should be the most efficient. (If you really timeit, please post the result.) It is only less readable and less understandable without the explanation. Anyway, you can add the comment with the shift operator:

THIS_VAR_0 = 0               # default
THIS_VAR_1 = 1               # 1 << 0
...
This_Var_N = 536870912       # 1 << 30

Beware: You have the bug in the question. If THIS_VAR_0 should be zero, then it cannot be generated as 2**0.

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