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I am very new to making bash scripts, but my goal here is to take a .txt file I have and assign the string of words in the txt file to a variable. I have tried this (no clue if I am on the right track or not).

#!/bin/bash
FILE="answer.txt"
file1="cat answer.txt"
print $file1

When I run this, I get

Warning: unknown mime-type for "cat" -- using "application/octet-stream"
Error: no such file "cat"
Error: no "print" mailcap rules found for type "text/plain"

What can I do to make this work?

Edit** When I change it to:

#!/bin/bash
    FILE="answer.txt"
    file1=$(cat answer.txt)
    print $file1

I get this instead:

Warning: unknown mime-type for "This" -- using "application/octet-stream"
Warning: unknown mime-type for "text" -- using "application/octet-stream"
Warning: unknown mime-type for "string" -- using "application/octet-stream"
Warning: unknown mime-type for "should" -- using "application/octet-stream"
Warning: unknown mime-type for "be" -- using "application/octet-stream"
Warning: unknown mime-type for "a" -- using "application/octet-stream"
Warning: unknown mime-type for "varible." -- using "application/octet-stream"
Error: no such file "This"
Error: no such file "text"
Error: no such file "string"
Error: no such file "should"
Error: no such file "be"
Error: no such file "a"
Error: no such file "varible."

When I enter cat answer.txt it prints out this text string should be a varible like it should but, I still can't get the bash to do that with the varible.

share|improve this question
    
file_contents=$( cat answer.txt )? –  Waleed Khan Jan 2 '13 at 4:07
    
@WaleedKhan I tried this and now get the above errors –  BluGeni Jan 2 '13 at 4:18
1  
As I said in my answer you're using print instead of echo. Also, you probably don't need the FILE="answer.txt" you're not using it anywhere. –  Jeffrey Theobald Jan 2 '13 at 4:23
    
print is Korn shell, if using Bash you can only use echo (which is also supported by Korn shell). –  cdarke Jan 2 '13 at 13:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You need the backticks to capture output from a command (and you probably want echo instead of print):

file1=`cat answer.txt`
echo $file1
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for finding both my beginner mistakes! –  BluGeni Jan 2 '13 at 4:25

The $() construction returns the stdout from a command.

file_contents=$(cat answer.txt)
share|improve this answer
    
+1; more specifically, it is called command substitution: tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/commandsub.html –  sampson-chen Jan 2 '13 at 4:10
3  
That's not strictly speaking true. The result of this command is 0 (which is stored in $?), the output of this command is the contents of the file. –  Jeffrey Theobald Jan 2 '13 at 4:10
    
I tried this and now get the above errors –  BluGeni Jan 2 '13 at 4:18
    
@JeffreyTheobald, thanks, good point. –  harpo Jan 2 '13 at 14:50

In bash $(< answer.txt) is a builtin shorthand for $(cat answer.txt)

I suspect you're running this print:

NAME  
    run-mailcap, see, edit, compose, print − execute programs via entries in the mailcap file
share|improve this answer
2  
It's not really a shorthand. It's, according to the bash reference manual equivalent by faster. This is definitely the answer to the OP. (It should be the accepted one). You should also mention how to print the expansion of $file1: echo "$file1". –  gniourf_gniourf Jan 2 '13 at 10:53

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