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I have a Facebook feed located via this URL: https://www.facebook.com/feeds/page.php?id=131872766880896&format=json.

It's in JSON format as specified by the URL.

When I enter this URL on my browser, I get a valid JSON. However, if I were to request this URL from a PHP page, either using PHP script like file_get_contents then json_decode, or jQuery getJSON, what I get is a HTML response, which is literally a Facebook page asking me to upgrade my browser. The HTML code for this response can be seen by inputting the above URL into the JSON Lint validator.

I have to use this method because the site I am building the feed for does not have an App ID associated with it, so I can't get an access token unless a personal Facebook account is used, and this is also not a feasible option due to the deprecation of online_access, which means I will have to manually regenerate a long lived access token every 60 days. Or is there another workaround to this? I only need to display the last entry on the page's Feed, so I was thinking of something like getting the content at $data['entries'][0]['content'], where $data is the JSON object.

The post here, Loading facebook wall feed JSON issues, shows that the user has ended up loading it via PHP and then populating his page via AJAX. But as mentioned above as well, loading it via PHP gives me the HTML code block that was generated by inputting the Facebook feed URL I want to use into JSON Lint. This is what my PHP code looks like:

<?php
$feed = file_get_contents('https://www.facebook.com/feeds/page.php?id=131872766880896&format=json');
echo $feed;
?>
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Facebook is checking the user agent HTTP header – so if you want to access resources that are “protected” this way, you have to send a user agent header with your request that looks like a current, “real” browser. –  CBroe Jan 2 '13 at 13:31
    
Thanks that solved it. If you could post it as a reply to this question, I can mark it as the solution. –  Julian Wen Hsi Lee Jan 2 '13 at 23:48

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Facebook is checking the user agent HTTP header – so if you want to access resources that are “protected” this way, you have to send a user agent header with your request that looks like a current, “real” browser.

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