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After reading the post here, I tried to get the value by regex as below:

var myString = "<a href='/search.html?id=HDJ&area=ASD&estate=JKG&ppt=3'></a>";
var myRegexp = /&estate=(.*?)(?:\s|$)/g;
var match = myRegexp.exec(myString);
match[1]

The result was JKG&propertytype=3'></a>, but I only want JKG. Strictly speaking I want the value between &estate= and &ppt Could someone suggest how to do that?

Thanks

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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A Regular Expression:

/&estate=(.*?)&ppt=/g

Note: I wouldn't recommend using regular expressions to parse query strings. It's brittle. Consider if the variables in the query string change order. If that can be the case, I recommend reading - Parse query string in JavaScript.

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+1 for the recommended reading. I have used and loved that snippet. –  ben author Jan 2 '13 at 5:16
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do:

var myString = "<a href='/search.html?id=HDJ&area=ASD&estate=JKG&ppt=3'></a>";
var myRegexp = /estate=(.*)&ppt=/g;
var match = myRegexp.exec(myString);
console.log( match[1] );
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Thanks for the suggestion, but what is the different between /estate=(.*)&ppt=/g; and /estate=(.*?)&ppt=/g;? –  Charles Yeung Jan 2 '13 at 6:25
    
Charles Yeung: * = 0 or more times and ? = 0 or 1 times Therefore, having ? is redundant for *? To verify, enter and test your regex here. –  arttronics Jan 2 '13 at 6:38
    
Screenshot for above regex http://i.stack.imgur.com/x1kdU.png –  arttronics Jan 2 '13 at 6:46
    
@arttronics, individual that is correct. But together *? means a non-greedy 0 or more match. –  Jason McCreary Jan 2 '13 at 12:47
    
@JasonMcCreary, I forgot to look at that as a group. So then, (RegExp?) is non-greedy, while as you say (*?) is non-greedy 0 or more times, I certainly agree. However, I don't see a logical difference in your regex requiring it to be greedy to function correctly. Perchance when your regex is part of another group, then it sings it's use. Am I mistaken that it needs to be greedy as it stands? –  arttronics Jan 2 '13 at 22:22
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If only the solution is important then you can use the following:

var myString = "<a href='/search.html?id=HDJ&area=ASD&estate=JKG&ppt=3'></a>";
var indx1 = mystring.indexOf("&estate=") + 8;
var indx2 = mystring.indexOf("&ppt");
var neededString = mystring.substring(indx1, indx2);
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Just exclude ampersands from the selection:

var myRegexp = /&estate=([^&]+)/g;

You might want to change it to this, in case estate is the first parameter:

var myRegexp = /[\?&]estate=([^&]+)/g;
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jsFiddle

Based on your result value, just split it at the ampersand, no new or alternate regex required.

JavaScript:

var myString = "<a href='/search.html?id=HDJ&area=ASD&estate=JKG&ppt=3'></a>";
var myRegexp = /&estate=(.*?)(?:\s|$)/g;
var match = myRegexp.exec(myString);

var value = match[1].split('&')[0];

alert( value );
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