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I am using .Net:

fulltext = File.ReadAllText(@location);

to read text anyfile content at given locatin. I got result as:

fulltext="# vdk10.syx\t1.1 - 3/15/94\r# @(#)Copyright (C) 1987-1993 Verity, Inc.\r#\r# Synonym-list Database Descriptor\r#\r$control: 1\rdescriptor:\r{\r data-table: syu\r {\r worm:\tTHDSTAMP\t\tdate\r worm:\tQPARSER\t\t\ttext\r\t/_hexdata = yes\r varwidth:\tWORD\t\tsyv\r fixwidth:\tEXPLEN\t\t\t2 unsigned-integer\r varwidth:\tEXPLIST\t\tsyx\r\t/_hexdata = yes\r }\r data-table: syw\r {\r varwidth:\tSYNONYMS\tsyz\r }\r}\r\r ";

Now, I want this fulltext to be displayed in html page so that special characters are recognized in html properly. For examples: \r should be replaced by line break tag so that they are properly formatted in html page display.

Is there any .net class to do this? I am looking for universal method since i am reading file and I can have any special characters. Thanks in advance for help or just direction.

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How about HttpUtility.HtmlEncode()? –  Elad Lachmi Jan 2 '13 at 5:29
    
pretty simple search if you use search box at top right... or google –  charlietfl Jan 2 '13 at 5:32
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2 Answers 2

You're trying to solve two problems:

  1. Ensure special characters are properly encoded
  2. Pretty-print your text

Solve them in this order:

  1. First, encode the text, by importing the System.Web namespace and using HttpUtility (asked on StackOverflow). Use the result in step 2.
  2. Pretty-printing is trickier, depending on the amount of pretty-printing that you want. Here are a few approaches, in increasing order of difficulty:
    • Put the text in a pre element. This should preserve newlines, tabs, spaces. You can still adjust the font used using CSS if you first slap a CSS class on the pre.
    • Replace all \r, \r\n and remaining \n with <br/>.
    • Study the structure of your text, parse it according to this structure, and provide specific tags in specific contexts. For example, the tab characters in your example may be indicative of a list of items. HTML provides the ol and ul elements for lists. Similarly, consecutive line breaks may indicate paragraphs, for which HTML provides the well known p element.
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thanks for your suggestion. –  Lasang Jan 2 '13 at 8:49
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Thanks Everyone here for your valuable comment. I solved my formatting problem in client side with following code.

document.getElementById('textView').innerText = fulltext;

Here textview is the div where i want to display my fulltext . I don't think i need to replace special characters in string fulltext. I output as shown in the figure.

enter image description here

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