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Why Does not 'ref' work in this case :

<xs:complexType name="Team">
    <xs:sequence>
        <xs:element name="Name" type="xs:string"/>
        <xs:element name="Size">
            <xs:simpleType>
                <xs:restriction base="xs:integer">
                    <xs:totalDigits value="1"/>
                </xs:restriction>
            </xs:simpleType>
        </xs:element>
        <xs:element ref="Size"/>
    </xs:sequence>
</xs:complexType>

The element Size has local scope , Can't it be reused locally?

Edit:The above case may not make much sense.Consider the Case below , is there no way to reuse the existing definition of "Size":

<xs:complexType name="Team">
    <xs:sequence>
        <xs:element name="Name" type="xs:string"/>
        <xs:element name="Size">
            <xs:simpleType>
                <xs:restriction base="xs:integer">
                    <xs:totalDigits value="1"/>
                </xs:restriction>
            </xs:simpleType>
        </xs:element>
        <xs:element name="teamLeads">
            <xs:complexType>
                <xs:sequence>
                    <xs:element ref="Size"/>
                </xs:sequence>
            </xs:complexType>
        </xs:element>
    </xs:sequence>
</xs:complexType>
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2 Answers 2

You can only reference top-level elements.

{term} The (top-level) element declaration ·resolved· to by the ·actual value· of the ref [attribute].

http://www.w3.org/TR/2004/REC-xmlschema-1-20041028/structures.html#declare-element (see the last section in the box)

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Usually in other programming languages , local elements can be used in their complete scope.XML local elements don't work that way? –  nikel Jan 2 '13 at 8:26
    
No, they don't. You make a nice point - they could have made it work that way, but didn't. If you're not sure what they decided, please check the element declaration section of the spec I linked to. :-) BTW: local declarations are local to their complex type - so in your second example, the two Sizes are in different symbol spaces. w3.org/TR/2004/REC-xmlschema-1-20041028/… (3rd para) Every complex type definition defines its own local attribute and element declaration symbol spaces, where these symbol spaces are distinct from each other –  13ren Jan 2 '13 at 10:44

Why Does not 'ref' work in this case

Because you are trying to define same element twice. Even if you don't use ref but name it will error out!

It is as good as declaring element twice like this:

example:

<xs:complexType name="Team">
    <xs:sequence>
        <xs:element name="Name" type="xs:string"/>
        <xs:element name="Size">
            <xs:simpleType>
                <xs:restriction base="xs:integer">
                    <xs:totalDigits value="1" />
                </xs:restriction>
            </xs:simpleType>
        </xs:element>
        <xs:element name="Size">
            <xs:simpleType>
                <xs:restriction base="xs:integer">
                    <xs:totalDigits value="1" />
                </xs:restriction>
            </xs:simpleType>
        </xs:element>
     </xs:sequence>
  </xs:complexType>

A ComplexType cannot have element of same name with same or different type multiple times defined.. Warning : Elements with the same name and in the same scope must have the same type.

This might be the reason for the error you are getting.. The message may not be clear but the reason is same.

Edit: In situations like this, we use maxOccurs, which does the job!
If you want to use ref then corresponding element should be in different XSD (imported via namespace) or atleast outside current ComplexType

With the same name there can be multiple elements in the different hierarchy! of different type !! XSD allows this! and it has to allow!
And When you use ref with this name, which element should it consider?? it will become an ambiguous definition! isn't it?
This is the reason, XSD doesn't allow non-global elements as ref.. Though your current code doesn't have multiple elements with same name, it can have ..

Here is the example for multiple elements at different hierarchy with different types:

<xs:complexType>
  <xs:sequence>
    <xs:element name="Name" type="xs:string"/>
    <xs:element name="Size">
      <xs:simpleType>
        <xs:restriction base="xs:integer">
          <xs:totalDigits value="1" />
        </xs:restriction>
      </xs:simpleType>
    </xs:element>
    <xs:element name="something">
      <xs:complexType>
        <xs:sequence>
          <xs:element name="Size" type="xs:string"/>
        </xs:sequence>
      </xs:complexType>
    </xs:element>
    <!--<xs:element ref="Size" />-->
  </xs:sequence>
</xs:complexType>
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"ref" does not mean declaration of an element , it means referring to a previous declaration,right? So , in my initial code I am just trying to refer to that existing element.What went wrong then? –  nikel Jan 2 '13 at 8:25
    
not declaration but specification! it's like having a type defined somewhere else and using it in current place! Ultimately you are forcing Size to be appearing two times! (ofcourse with same type!) which is not welcome as per XSD rules. Rather maxOccurs is more suitable here .. –  InfantPro'Aravind' Jan 2 '13 at 8:27
    
I agree that ref is not a declaration but ultimate result for both your try and the example I have provided end up as same! –  InfantPro'Aravind' Jan 2 '13 at 8:28
    
If you want to use ref then corresponding element should be in different XSD (imported via namespace) or atleast outside current ComplexType that means on (top-level) element declaration as mentioned in the link provided by 13ren –  InfantPro'Aravind' Jan 2 '13 at 8:33
    
Well , I understand that it works for globally declared elements.But my question is since its a locally declared element why can't it be referenced in the local scope? –  nikel Jan 2 '13 at 8:40

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