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I have a set up like this

file.h:

#pragma once
namespace a {
    int home(double a, double b, ...
    class b {
        int la();
    };
}

file.cpp

#include "file.h"    
using namespace a;

int home(double a, double b, ...) {
    //function stuff
}

int b::la() {
    home(1, 2, ...)
}

And b is instantiated and used in main like this:

#include "file.h"    
b instant;
instant.la()

But I have been getting this linker error everywhere where I am using the function home:

undefined reference to `a::home(double, double, ...)'
In function a::b::la()

I am pretty sure all of the CMakelists are correctly set up and everything is included.

But when I change the file.cpp to be in the namespace:

namespace a {
    all of the same stuff
}

and it works just fine?

Any ideas why this is happening?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Your problem is with using namespace a; up the top of your file.cpp. This is simply pulling in all the definitions from namespace a into your code. Thus, when you define int home(double, double, ...), you aren't providing an implementation for a::home, you're creating another function. You then have int a::home(double, double, ...) and int home(double, double, ...).

You either need int a::home(double, double, ...) or to wrap everything in your .cpp file that's under namespace a in namespace a { ... }.

Edit: Your confusion stems from what a using declaration does. It simply pulls everything in from the a namespace and allows you to use it unqualified. It does not allow you to omit the qualification in definitions.

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You need to define the function inside the namespace a because there is where it is declared:

namespace a
{
    int home(double a, double b, ...) {
      //function stuff
    }
}
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In file.cpp wrap definitions inside namespace a, that will define them in namespace a and linker can find symbols.

namespace a{

int home(double a, double b, ...) {
    //function stuff
}

int b::la() {
    home(1, 2, ...)
}

} // namespace a

Node, using namespace a doesn't define your functions inside namespace a.

Have a look at google c++ coding style guide, it provides good c++ coding style.

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The definition of home needs to say a::home since that is the namespace it was declared within. Hence the undefined reference to "a::home".

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But I am using namespace a so i thought i wouldn't need to? –  Ben Jan 2 '13 at 6:27
    
Indeed you would. Like others have said in their answers, using namespace simply imports all the declarations within the namespace. It does not put you in that namespace. So you still need to write int a::home(...) to define the function within the a namespace. –  Victor Zamanian Jan 2 '13 at 17:50
    
Yeah, thanks for your help! –  Ben Jan 2 '13 at 22:57

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