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Though $.ajax() can be used to do ajax things, I don't think its fit for posting values of a big form.

How would you post a big form (many fields) without entering all them by hand?

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2  
I think the OP is referring to posting a form with many fields. There's a lot of boilerplate code to write when you're posting the fields one-by-one and I think the OP is asking whether there is a way to simply post all fields on the form. This question was very useful for me. –  James Jones Nov 9 '09 at 14:53
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7 Answers

up vote 25 down vote accepted

What is your reasoning behind that assumption? POST is designed for transferring larger amounts of data than GET. An AJAX POST request is almost exactly the same as a "normal" POST request, it's just bundled and handled internally by a browser in a slightly different manner. A couple of headers might be slightly different, but the data is all the same. Why should AJAX fail to handle a "large" form?

What would you even define as a "large" form anyway?

Edit: Thanks for the clarification on your question. I understand what you're asking now, and I see where you're coming from. For a form with a lot of inputs, it could be a pain to bundle it up into an Ajax request all the time.

Since you're using jQuery, there's an easy solution to this. Check out the serialize() method. You give it a form, and it gives you back a query string of all the form input elements and values which you can pass directly to an ajax request. There's an example there on the manual page that shows how it's done.

All you have to do is this:

$.ajax({
    data: $("form").serialize(),
    //etc.
});

where "form" is the id of your form.

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4  
I disagree that POST is for transferring larger amount of data then GET. POST is for altering the state of the server with new information. GET is for retrieving a resource from the server. –  John F. Miller Sep 11 '09 at 16:15
    
How is serialize() done?I'm caring for its performance. –  omg Sep 11 '09 at 16:16
2  
@John: Yes, that is the primary intention of each. However, there is no practical limit on the size of a POST request, whereas GET requests have known limits that cause problems when exceeded. I suppose my use of the phrase "specifically for" is mildly incorrect, as it implies that that is the only purpose of POST, which of course was not the intended interpretation. –  zombat Sep 11 '09 at 16:23
    
@Shore - Well, it's all done client-side, and it basically does the same thing that you would otherwise have to do manually - it accesses all the form elements and concatenates their values into a string. I'm sure you won't notice a performance hit. You could always benchmark it if you were worried about it. It's definitely the right tool to answer your question though. –  zombat Sep 11 '09 at 16:26
    
whooooah how does this not have more upvotes!! –  Brock Hensley Jun 4 '13 at 14:37
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You probably want to use serialize if you don't want to manually deal with each element.

$.ajax({
   type: "POST",
   url: "form.php",
   data: $("#form_id").serialize()
   success: function(msg) {
     alert("Form Submitted: " + msg);
   }
 });
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You can use jQuery.post( url, data, callback, type), as its simpler to jQuery.ajax( options ).

By using serialize, you can send the whole form automatically.

$.post("/post_handler/",
    $("form#my_form").serialize(),
    function(json){
        /*your success code*/
    }, "json");

A more complete example:

<script>
$().ready(function(){
    $("form#my_form submit").click(function(){
        $.post("/post_handler/",
            $("form#my_form").serialize(),
            function(json){
                /*your success code*/
            }, "json");
        return false;
    });
}
</script>
<form id="my_form" action="/post_handler/" method="post">
  <input type="text" name="text1" value="my text 1" />
  <input type="text" name="text2" value="my text 2" />
  <input type="submit" name="submit_button" value="Send" />
</form>

This would override the default post, and perform it with AJAX.

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What about the serialize() itself?How is it done principly? –  omg Sep 11 '09 at 16:14
    
$("form#my_form").serialize() gives you the contents of <form id="my_form"> ready to be send through the wire in querystring format (multiple=Multiple2&check=check2&radio=radio1). –  voyager Sep 11 '09 at 16:17
    
You talk about what while I'm asking how. –  omg Sep 11 '09 at 16:18
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What you're asking is not hard. All you have to do is collect the content of the form and pass it to your server (usually using JSON).

Take a look at this howto:

http://net.tutsplus.com/javascript-ajax/submit-a-form-without-page-refresh-using-jquery/

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The trouble is how to collect the content from a large form?It'll be very long to write by hand. –  omg Sep 11 '09 at 16:09
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If you haven't tried it yet. Then create a BIG form (now whatever you mean by that) and use $.ajax() or jQuery Forms plugin to post it. You will know if it is for this kind of things or not!

EDIT:- (after your edit) Then forms plugin is for you! Give it a shot.

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Do you know how it decides post content?Automatically(some default mechanism like when we submit the form) or check one by one? –  omg Sep 11 '09 at 16:12
    
@Shore you said you have to set data manually which is.. This will automatically submit all the fields in the form. You can serialize a subset of fields to query string. Please check their documentation here:malsup.com/jquery/form –  TheVillageIdiot Sep 11 '09 at 16:22
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Try the jquery form plugin.

It probably does exactly what you need to do out of the box.

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I've sent rather complex (large) forms with $.ajax() and had no issue. I have not sent files over ajax requests, but I've seen it done and it works better then traditional posts because it doesn't tie up the browser while you are uploading.

Based on your comment to @zombat, My guess it that you have a very large number of inputs, most of which are going to be blank most of the time. Two suggestions here 1) split the inputs into separate forms and only send each as soon as it is touched/completed. 2) examine the state of your form with JavaScript and wrap the information into JSON or XML, and Instead of posting the form data, post just the data structure.

"Large" should not be a problem, perhaps you can find a better adjective to describe your data that will let everyone know why it is hard to send.

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