Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Say I have this html code:

<html>  
<body>   
<div id="Div1" style="position:relative">
   <span style="position:absolute;top:100px">My text</span>
</div> 
<div id="Div2">
Test
</div>
</body>
</html>

What should I do to make Div2 always below Div1 regardless of the content of Div1? Because the span uses position:absolute in Div1, the content of Div2 appears above the content of Div1.

share|improve this question
    
Please paste the css you use. –  Santi Sep 11 '09 at 16:19
    
there is no other css. –  Anthony Sep 11 '09 at 16:35

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The reason div2 displays above div1 is because div2 is absolutely positioned. That means that div1 doesn't participate in the normal document flow, as if it was pulled out of the document. So, div2 shows up at the top, then your absolute positioning pushes div1 down to 100px.

Take the absolute positioning off of div1, then use margins or padding to move it down to the desired location. That way, the normal html rendering will place div2 below div1.

If you're forced to absolutely position div1, then you need to absolutely position div2 as well. You may need to use javascript to figure out the height of div1 and set the top of div2 appropriately.

<html>  
<body>   
<div id="Div1" style="position:absolute; top: 100px;">
   <span>My text</span>
</div> 
<div id="Div2" style="position:absolute; top: 130px;">
Test
</div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
Or just nest Div2 into that span/div and put margin-top on it and voala... ;) –  Gavrisimo Sep 11 '09 at 17:36

Why not do this ?

<div id="Div1" style="margin-top:100px">
   <span>My text</span>
</div> 
<div id="Div2">
Test
</div>

I don't quite get why you are doing it that way. Could you explain a bit more what you're trying to do? I'm sure there's a better way

share|improve this answer
    
i've edited my answer, this should work... unless you really need to have absolute positioning all over the place –  marcgg Sep 11 '09 at 17:14
    
Basically I have 2 Divs and I want Div2 to be below any content of Div1. In reality, Div1 contains some images and these images are located within the Div1 using absolute positioning. I would like the content of Div2 to be below those images which are in Div1. –  Anthony Sep 11 '09 at 17:16
    
What you did work but you changed the question. The content of Div1 is positioned using absolute positioning. –  Anthony Sep 11 '09 at 17:18

Others have answered this question correctly about position:relative vs. position:absolute and page flow in the container div.

Just to add to the answer. I found the following tutorial really helpful when I was learning about positioning in CSS.

Learn CSS Positioning in Ten Steps

share|improve this answer

Jeff: div is as standard block elements, so that wont make any difference.

You could try:

<div id="Div1" style="position:relative; display:inline-block">
  <span style="position:absolute;top:100px">My text</span>
</div> 
<div id="Div2">
  Test
</div>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks but it doesn't make any difference. Div2 still appears above Div1. –  Anthony Sep 11 '09 at 17:03

do you want div2 below div1 or at the very bottom of the page? if you want it below div1 then add

clear:both;

to div2.

if you want it fixed to the bottom of the page then use a fixed position property on the div2

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't work –  Anthony Sep 11 '09 at 17:20

Maybe something like this?

<html>
<body>
    <div id="Div1" style="position:relative">
    	<div style="position:absolute;top:0">just some text<br />very long text<br />very long text<br />very long text<div id="Div2" style="margin-top:30px">div thats always below(30px's below)</div></div>		
    </div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer

use display:block; on those divs

share|improve this answer
3  
Divs are blocks by default. –  user151323 Sep 11 '09 at 16:20
    
Indeed. It doesn't make any difference. –  Anthony Sep 11 '09 at 16:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.