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I need to use "FPAT" or the equivalent function "patsplit" of gawk. But it seems the installed version of gawk is 3.1.5 on our CentOs server.

I tried updating gawk with these commands:

yum update gawk;

And the server showed: "No Packages marked for Update"

I also tried reinstalling gawk with:

 yum install gawk;

server output: "Package gawk-3.1.5-15.el5.x86_64 already installed and latest version "

Where i need gawk 4.0 or above to use those FPAT OR patsplit. And why i need to use them? well i am trying to process a CSV file, and it seems the CSV file has optional quotation and embedded comma.

Example:

From a csv row like this:

this,is,a,"csv,with,embedded coma"

I need to split the fields like this:

this

is

a

"csv,with,embedded comma"

And here is the gawk code:

awk '{patsplit("this,is,a,\"csv,with,embedded comma\"",a,"([^,]*)|(\"([^\"]|\"\")+\"[^,]*)",seps); for(i=0;i<length(a);i++) print a[i];}';

Can anyone help me on this please ?

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try using csvquote in your pipeline to make the data easy for awk to interpret. This is a script I wrote that replaces the commas inside quoted fields with nonprinting characters, and then restores them.

So if your awk command looked like this originally:

awk -F, '{print $3 "," $5}' inputfile.csv

... it can be made to work with csv quoted separators like this:

csvquote inputfile.csv | awk -F, '{print $3 "," $5}' | csvquote -u

For code and more documentation, see https://github.com/dbro/csvquote

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I think we could use match() to get the fields.

here are the codes:

awk '{ $0=$0","                                   
while($0) {
  match($0,/ *"[^"]*" *,|[^,]*,/) 
  field=substr($0,RSTART,RLENGTH)            
  gsub(/,$/,"",field)   
  print field
  $0=substr($0,RLENGTH+1)              
}}' file

test with your input example:

kent$  echo 'this,is,a,"csv,with,embedded coma"'|awk '{
$0=$0","                                   
while($0) {
  match($0,/ *"[^"]*" *,|[^,]*,/) 
  field=substr($0,RSTART,RLENGTH)            
  gsub(/,$/,"",field)   
  print field
  $0=substr($0,RLENGTH+1)              
}}'
this
is
a
"csv,with,embedded coma"
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The simplest thing to do is convert the commas outside of the quotes to something else before you do your real processing. For example:

$ cat file
this,is,a,"csv,with,embedded coma",and,here,"is,another",one
and,here,"is,another,line"
$
$ awk 'BEGIN{FS=OFS="\""}{for (i=1;i<=NF;i+=2) gsub(/,/,";",$i)}1' file
this;is;a;"csv,with,embedded coma";and;here;"is,another";one
and;here;"is,another,line"

If you don't like ";"s as field separators, pick something else like a control character or here's an example using newlines as the FSs and blank lines as the RSs:

$ awk 'BEGIN{FS=OFS="\""; ORS="\n\n"}{for (i=1;i<=NF;i+=2) gsub(/,/,"\n",$i)}1' file
this
is
a
"csv,with,embedded coma"
and
here
"is,another"
one

and
here
"is,another,line"

$ awk 'BEGIN{FS=OFS="\""; ORS="\n\n"}{for (i=1;i<=NF;i+=2) gsub(/,/,"\n",$i)}1' file |
awk -F'\n' -v RS= '{for (i=1;i<=NF;i++) print NR,i,"<" $i ">"}'
1 1 <this>
1 2 <is>
1 3 <a>
1 4 <"csv,with,embedded coma">
1 5 <and>
1 6 <here>
1 7 <"is,another">
1 8 <one>
2 1 <and>
2 2 <here>
2 3 <"is,another,line">

It only gets tricky if you have embedded newlines or embedded escaped double quotes.

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Ooh, +1 for substituting in every second field separated by quotes! I'll keep that one. :) –  ghoti Jan 14 '13 at 22:21
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