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Previously, I had two methods and I labelled one with [WebGet] and one with [WebInvoke(Method = "POST"]

when I did a GET or a POST to the URL that I specified, it would always call the correct method.

The URLs were:

POST: fish-length
GET: fish-length?start-date={startDate}&pondId={pondId}

Now that I'm using web api, I have to define my routes seperately, like this:

    RouteTable.Routes.MapHttpRoute(
        name: "AddFishLength",
        routeTemplate: "fish-length",
        defaults: new
        {
            controller = "FishApi",
            action = "AddFishLength"
        });


    RouteTable.Routes.MapHttpRoute(
       name: "GetFishLength",
       routeTemplate: "fish-length?start-date={startDate}&pondId={pondId}",
       defaults: new
       {
           controller = "FishApi",
           action = "GetFishLength"
       });

However the second route doesn't work, because you're not allowed a ? in the routeTemplate.

I can change the URL format to something like fish-length/{startDate}/{pondId} but it's really not a very nice way to expose the service.

Is there a better way to do this? Also because I was doing a POST and GET to the same url before, I'd need to ensure my routing method still allowed this. Assuming the above worked, I'm still not sure how it would route correctly.

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2 Answers 2

No, you don't need to define separate routes. All you need is a single route:

RouteTable.Routes.MapHttpRoute(
    name: "AddFishLength",
    routeTemplate: "fish-length",
    defaults: new
    {
        controller = "FishApi",
    }
);

and then follow the RESTful naming conventions of your ApiController's actions:

public class FishApiController: ApiController
{
    // will be called for GET /fish-length
    public HttpResponseMessage Get()
    {
        // of course this action could take a view model
        // and of course that this view model properties
        // will automatically be bound from the query string parameters
    }

    // will be called for POST /fish-length
    public HttpResponseMessage Post()
    {
        // of course this action could take a view model
        // and of course that this view model properties
        // will automatically be bound from the POST body payload
    }
}

So assuming you have a view model:

public class FishViewModel
{
    public int PondId { get; set; }
    public DateTime StartDate { get; set; }
}

go ahead and modify your controller actions to take this parameter:

public class FishApiController: ApiController
{
    // will be called for GET /fish-length
    public HttpResponseMessage Get(FishViewModel model)
    {
    }

    // will be called for POST /fish-length
    public HttpResponseMessage Post(FishViewModel model)
    {
    }
}

You could obviously have different view models for the different actions.

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I couldn't figure out how it mapped to the action. Assume my method is called GetFishLength then how does it know to call that, and not GetFishName? You don't specify in the routing information the name of the action. –  SLC Jan 2 '13 at 12:03

You can't specify the query string parameters in the route template - but as long as you have a method that matches the names of the parameters WebApi should be clever enough to figure it out on its own.

public HttpResponseMessage Get(string id) would correspond to a request for {controller}?id=xxx

However, it's hard to tell without seeing the actual objects how you should go about solving your case. E.g. WebApi doesn't like complex types in a Get request, as well as it supports url-encoded content in post data in a particular way only.

As for differentiating between Get and Post that's quite simple - WebApi knows which method you used when sending the request and then it looks for a method name starting with Get/Post or decorated with the HttpGet/Post attribute.

I recommend taking a look at the following articles - they helped me understand how it works:

http://www.west-wind.com/weblog/posts/2012/Aug/16/Mapping-UrlEncoded-POST-Values-in-ASPNET-Web-API

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/jmstall/archive/2012/04/16/how-webapi-does-parameter-binding.aspx

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