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For http persistent connection I wrote the following code:

class LongPolling(tornado.web.RequestHandler):
    waiters = set()
    def get(self):
        LongPolling.waiters.add(self)
        for x in LongPolling.waiters:
            x.write("Broadcast all")
            x.flush()
        return

    def on_close(self):
        logging.warning("Connection closed *********")
        LongPolling.waiters.remove(self)

if __name__ == "__main__":
    application = tornado.web.Application([
        (r"/", LongPolling),
    ])
    application.listen(8888)
    tornado.ioloop.IOLoop.instance().start()

I am braodcasting every time a new connection comes.. But the problem with this is, immediately after get() the connection closes.

So how do I let the connection open after a get() call?

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1  
You might want to consider using Tornado implementation of Socket.io if it's not an overkill for your purposes. –  Hidden Markov Jan 2 '13 at 12:58
    
does that mean tornado does not have support for this type of persistent connection? –  user739711 Jan 2 '13 at 13:03
    
@TokenMacGuy what I ment here was, is there a way to hold the socket-connection, so that I can write on that later. –  user739711 Jan 2 '13 at 14:04

1 Answer 1

There is no such thing as a "persistent" http connection. the Connection: keep-alive header permits client and server to perform a new http request/response cycle without creating a new underlying tcp connection, to save a bit of network traffic, but that is not visible to the application; and usually implemented in the server side by a reverse proxy. clients will have to make new requests when they receive responses to their GET's.

If that's not what you had in mind, just that you want to respond to requests a bit at a time, then you might be looking for tornado.web.asynchronous. Note however, that most in-browser clients won't benefit from this very much; XHR's for instance won't be fired until the response completes, so browser applications will have to start a new request anyway

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how much time is keep-alive in tornado? –  Abdelouahab Pp Jan 2 '13 at 22:20
    
This is useful however for Server Sent Events, where the benefit is tangible : no need for the client to keep trying to reconnect to the event source on close. So for SSE tornado.web.asynchronous may work ok. –  Cris Apr 9 at 1:51

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