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I have a list of types that I want to replace, for logging purposes, but without changing my code (the logging part it's just to use esporadically). I'm looking for an easy way to create some kind of proxies for my class fields, in order to know, in runtime, when my class fields are changed or, when I don't have the class source code (e.g. LinkedList), when class methods are called.

As an example, if I have this code, which is a class that belongs to me and I just need to be warned about MyClass field state changes:

public class MyClass {

   private LinkedList<Integer> myList;

   private int myInteger;

   public void myMethod() 
   {
      myInteger = 15;
      myList = new LinkedList<Integer>();
   }

   public void myOtherMethod()
   {
      myList.add(1);
   }

   public LinkedList<Integer> getMyList() {
      return myList;
   }
}

I need to know, in runtime (but the code modification can be done in compile time), every time that someone changes the value of myInteger, add an element to myList and change myList referenced LinkedList. I think that the solution shouldn't be done entirely with code analysis, since list references can be passed by parameter to everywhere, like in getMyList()

In this case, the logging it's just for fields, wheter they're primitive or objects. For types that I don't have the code (like LinkedList), I'll be happy if I get notified when some method is called or any public field it's read or written.

share|improve this question
1  
What is your question? I am not clear what you are trying to achieve even if I suspect it's not worth trying to get the compiler to do it for you. – Peter Lawrey Jan 2 '13 at 13:00
    
sorry @PeterLawrey, I'll change it now – rnunes Jan 2 '13 at 13:01
1  
I still don't see a ? for a question. It's still not clear why you want to do what you suggest. It's generally consider bad practice to return a collection which will be changed. Instead an immutable copy can returned to prevent this. – Peter Lawrey Jan 2 '13 at 13:09
1  
Not sure if this answers your question, but I've got an example of how to rewrite classfiles to intercept field writes on github at github.com/jhorstmann/PropertyChangeSupport and github.com/jhorstmann/PropertyChangeSupport/blob/master/… – Jörn Horstmann Jan 2 '13 at 13:33
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could probably use AspectJ for hooking up these events... see the pointcuts for infos on when it is possible to hook in.

Or you use CGLib or any other bytecode-library to modify the bytecode at loading time and inject additional logic like incrementing an access-counter or something like that on field-access.

Or you extend Lombok to weave in the needed code. (I found this easier than modifying plain java bytecode). This would then be compiletime

share|improve this answer

I suggest you only return an interface (not a concrete class) for a collection and make it immutable.

public class MyClass {
    private final List<Integer> myList = new ArrayList<>();
    private int myInteger;

    public void myMethod() {
        myInteger = 15;
    }

    public void myOtherMethod(int i) {
        myList.add(i);
    }

    public List<Integer> getMyList() {
        return Collections.unmodifiableList(myList);
    }
}

As you can see, the list cannot be modify by a caller so you don't need to be notified when this happens. If a caller want to modify the list, it has to call one of your methods in which case you will be aware of the changes.

I don't have the class source code (e.g. LinkedList),

You have access to it, you just shouldn't modify it. (You can do that too if you really wanted)

Instead you can subclass the collection which will modify any method you change. However, returning an immutable collection is best practice.

share|improve this answer
    
its about profiling. advising changes to the example code is like saying: "this is a slow program... dont profile it, use another one."... doesnt make much sense to me – wrm Jan 2 '13 at 13:16
    
@wrm The OP doesn't mention profiling in the "question", or performance, or analysis. It's not clear that is what he is asking. He hasn't asked a specific question so perhaps your mind reading powers are better than mine. ;) – Peter Lawrey Jan 2 '13 at 13:19
2  
it looks like that... or i just read the labels also... – wrm Jan 2 '13 at 13:20

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