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I have a problem related to foreign keys. I am using SQL Server 2008.

There are 2 tables, Customer and Invoice, and they look like this:

Customer table:
CustomerID
Name
Address

Invoice table:
InvoiceID
Date
CustomerID

The CustomerID column in the Customer table is a primary key, and the CustomerID column in the Invoice table has an foreign key.

I want to delete a row in the Customer table, but without deleting the connected row in the Invoice table. Is there a way to do that?

Edit:
I forgot to mention that the deleted customers are being stored in a log table, so the ID would still exist, but in a different table

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5  
you want to intentionally create a data integrity issue? what meaning will customerID 53 have in the invoice table when that customer is gone? –  Randy Jan 2 '13 at 13:05
1  
on the delete, you should be able to cascade FK values to null. –  Randy Jan 2 '13 at 13:07
1  
Just mark the customer as inactive. You still need the record. –  Ben Jan 2 '13 at 13:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

"I want to delete a row in the Customer table, but without deleting the connected row in the Invoice table."

The whole and entire point of foreign keys is to prevent you from doing this.

The constraint enforces a rule which states that an Invoice must belong to a Customer. So what would it mean in your application if an Invoice didn't belong to a Customer? To what should it belong instead?

Or to put it in business terms, if an Invoice doesn't have a Customer who pays it?


Of copurse, my rant assumes that Invoice.CustomnerID is a mandatory column. Perhaps your data model allows it to be optional. In which case set teh column to NULL and then you can delete the Customer record. Given the underlying business rule - invoices must be paid (or the company goes bankrupt) I think this would be a flawed data model, but hey!

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1  
in addition to that ( and most likely because of ) it is common in ERP systems to disable-flag customer-table entries (meaning customers are not active any more and only kept in database for historical reasons) –  Najzero Jan 2 '13 at 13:10
    
You're right, but I forgot to mention that the deleted customers are being stored in a log table, so the ID would still exist, but in a different table, is there another solution for that? –  Marc Jan 2 '13 at 13:16
2  
@Marc - Why a separate table rather than an is_deleted flag or deleted_date? You could have a view that filters by that to show just active customers. –  Martin Smith Jan 2 '13 at 13:20
    
Okay I'm going to stick with the is_deleted flag, thanks guys! –  Marc Jan 2 '13 at 13:22

Adjust your FK constraint from SQL Management Studio like here.. The Highlighted Delete Rule outlines what sort of enforcement you want to imply on the related table record, the approprite option I see can be Set Default or Set Null in the dropdown. Please consider the image attached.

enter image description here

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