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My goal is to create a hollow diamond using python.

Sample input:

Input an odd Integer:
      9

Sample output:

    *
   * *
  *   *
 *     *
*       *
 *     *
  *   *
   * *
    *

But so far, I have the following code that is not working right. Please help me to modify the code to achieve the goal above:

a=int(input("Input an odd integer: "))

k=1
c=1

r=a

while k<=r:
    while c<=r:
        print "*"
        c+=1

    r-=1
    c=1

    while c<=2*k-1:
        print "*"
        c+=1

    print "\n"
    k+=1

r=1
k=1
c=1

while k<=a-1:
   while c<=r:
       print " "
       c+=1

   r+=1
   c=1

   while c<= 2*(a-k)-1:
       print ("*")
       c+=1

   print "\n"
   k+=1

The code above return a result that is very far from my goal.

Input an odd integer: 7
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*


*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*


*
*
*
*
*
*
*


*
*
*
*
*
*
*



*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*


*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*


*
*
*
*
*
* 
*


*
*
*
*
*


*
*
*





*

I am actually converting the code from this post: http://www.programmingsimplified.com/c/source-code/c-program-print-diamond-pattern written in C language and will modify later for the hollow one but I can't get it... There is something wrong with my conversion..

share|improve this question
2  
Can you include the result from the current code? Seeing what it actually produces would make understanding and fixing it a little easier. –  Kjartan Jan 2 '13 at 13:10
    
ok.. I'll edit it... –  Ailen Samson Laguda Jan 2 '13 at 13:11
6  
Note that print automatically adds a newline. In order to suppress the automatic newline, you need a trailing comma in python2.x. e.g. print '*', -- I don't think that will make your code start to work, but it's one step in the right direction. –  mgilson Jan 2 '13 at 13:11
1  
Why dont you think of your own algorithm doing this rather than converting C code? –  AsheeshR Jan 2 '13 at 13:16
1  
you should add a , after prints where you don't want a new line (just saw that mgilson made the same note) –  nvlass Jan 2 '13 at 13:18

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Your problem is that you keep using print. The print statement (and the function in Python 3) will add a line-break after what you printed, unless you explicitely tell it not to. You can do that in Python 2 like this:

print '*', # note the trailing comma

Or in Python 3 (with the print function) like this:

print('*', end='')

My solution

I took my own take at the problem and came up with this solution:

# The diamond size
l = 9

# Initialize first row; this will create a list with a
# single element, the first row containing a single star
rows = ['*']

# Add half of the rows; we loop over the odd numbers from
# 1 to l, and then append a star followed by `i` spaces and
# again a star. Note that range will not include `l` itself.
for i in range(1, l, 2):
    rows.append('*' + ' ' * i + '*')

# Mirror the rows and append; we get all but the last row
# (the middle row) from the list, and inverse it (using
# `[::-1]`) and add that to the original list. Now we have
# all the rows we need. Print it to see what's inside.
rows += rows[:-1][::-1]

# center-align each row, and join them
# We first define a function that does nothing else than
# centering whatever it gets to `l` characters. This will
# add the spaces we need around the stars
align = lambda x: ('{:^%s}' % l).format(x)

# And then we apply that function to all rows using `map`
# and then join the rows by a line break.
diamond = '\n'.join(map(align, rows))

# and print
print(diamond)
share|improve this answer
    
hi.. it really works.. but I don't really understand the code... :) Thank you so much, I'll just research the syntax's meanings :) –  Ailen Samson Laguda Jan 2 '13 at 13:27
2  
I added some more comments, hopefully it’s easier to understand now. If you have further questions, feel free to ask! –  poke Jan 2 '13 at 13:34
    
yes.. thank you so much... :D –  Ailen Samson Laguda Jan 2 '13 at 13:41
    
Hi @poke, sorry to disturb again, I would like to ask what this line means: ('{:^%s}' % l).format(x)... I really don't get it... Thanks :) –  Ailen Samson Laguda Jan 2 '13 at 15:50
1  
It’s basically two things at once: '{:^%s}' % l is using the %-formatting; for l=9 this basically results in '{:^9}'. Now that string is a format string which, combined with str.format basically just centeres whatever comes at the first argument to fit 9 (or l) characters. It pads both sides of the string equally with spaces. –  poke Jan 2 '13 at 16:29

A Hollow diamond is the solution to the equation

|x|+|y| = N

on an integer grid. So Hollow diamond as a 1-liner:

In [22]: N = 9//2; print('\n'.join([''.join([('*' if abs(x)+abs(y) == N else ' ') for x in range(-N, N+1)]) for y in range(-N, N+1)]))
    *    
   * *   
  *   *  
 *     * 
*       *
 *     * 
  *   *  
   * *   
    *    
share|improve this answer
    
wow, a one liner. nice job man :) +1 mind=blown –  Inbar Rose Jan 2 '13 at 14:24
def diamond(n, c='*'):
    for i in range(n):
        spc = i * 2 - 1
        if spc >= n - 1:
            spc = n - spc % n - 4
        if spc < 1:
            print(c.center(n))
        else:
            print((c + spc * ' ' + c).center(n))

if __name__ == '__main__':
    diamond(int(input("Input an odd integer: ")))
share|improve this answer

this is not pretty, but its a function that does what you want:

def make_diamond(size):
    if not size%2:
        raise ValueError('odd number required')
    r = [' ' * space + '*' + ' ' * (size-2-(space*2)) + '*' + ' ' * space for space in xrange((size-1)/2)]    
    r.append(' ' * ((size-1)/2) + '*' + ' ' * ((size-1)/2))
    return '\n'.join(r[-1:0:-1] + r)
  • first i check to make sure its an odd number,
  • then i create a list of the lines from the center downwards.
  • then i create the last point.
  • then i return them as as a string, with a mirror of the bottom on top without the center line.

output:

>>> print make_diamond(5)
  *  
 * * 
*   *
 * * 
  *  
>>> print make_diamond(9)
    *    
   * *   
  *   *  
 *     * 
*       *
 *     * 
  *   *  
   * *   
    *   
share|improve this answer

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