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I have executed a java program on a 64-bit compiler and generated the byte code for that program. Is it possible to run the same byte code on a 32-bit compiler without loss of the data?

In my program I have declared a variable x=10024 on 64-bit compiler?
Then what will be the value of x in 32-bit compiler? If the value of x is same, How is it Possible without loss of data? Can you please elaborate?

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Yes, you can run the same bytecode on 32 and 64 bit machines. The JVM implementation for each OS shields you from differences. And that int variable x is represented as a 32 bit fixed point value in both, so no loss there. –  duffymo Jan 2 '13 at 13:24

7 Answers 7

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When you run the "32-bit" compiler, you are running the compiler code in a 32-bit JVM, and when you run the "64-bit" compiler you are running exactly the same code in a 64-bit JVM which will produce exactly the same byte code. If the byte code is not exactly the same, you have found a bug. The only difference is that the "64-bit" version might run slightly faster (as much as 5% at a guess)

I have executed a java program on a 64-bit compiler

You compile byte code in a compiler, not run it.

and generated the byte code for that program.

Byte code is not 32-bit or 64-bit and it makes no difference how you created it, or what JVM you ran the compiler in.

Is it possible to run the same byte code on a 32-bit compiler without loss of the data?

You can compile code with classes compiled by any version of Java up to the same one, regardless of whether it was 32-bit or 64-bit.

In my program I have declared a variable x=10024 on 64-bit compiler?

That doesn't make any sense. You might have compiled code like int x=10024; using a compiler running in a 64-bit JVM. How it was compiled make no difference whatsoever.

Then what will be the value of x in 32-bit compiler?

The same as for a compiler running in a 32-bit JVM, or any other JVM.

If the value of x is same, How is it Possible without loss of data?

There is no reason for there to be a loss of data. If x is an int it will be a 32-bit signed value regardless of how you compile the code or which JVM was used to run the compiler.

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The JVM guarantees that the bytecode will run equally well, whatever the architecture, whether it be 64bit or 32bit, whether it be little endian or big endian. In Java bytecode:

  • all primitive types are the same size;
  • all are big endian.

After that, the JVM may, or may not, optimize away the bytecode to native code -- at run time (and perform the necessary endianness magic beyond the scenes).

Think of the bytecode as "Java assembly language", if you prefer -- but there is only one such assembly language for all CPU architectures: "running" that assembly language is the role of the JVM.

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I assume you mean values in byte code are stored in big endian. The natively generated code is likely to use the native byte order. –  Peter Lawrey Jan 2 '13 at 14:39
    
Yes, that's what I mean. Editing for clarifications. –  fge Jan 2 '13 at 14:43

Java compiler generates bytecode that does not depend on the architecture of physical machine. Java Virtual Machine can run this byte code either its architecture is the same as the architecture of machine where the code was compiled or not.

Java integer type is 4 bytes. Either on 32, 64 or 128-bits machine. Java long type is 8 bytes. Etc, etc.

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Yes, irrespective of your platform value of primitive variables will remain same. Except for float data type, precision depends on whether you specify strictfp or not.

From Java Language Specification: Strictfp ensures that you get exactly the same results from your floating point calculations on every platform. If you don't use strictfp, the JVM implementation is free to use extra precision where available

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fge is correct.

In more detail: Java ensures that int has 4 bytes in BigEndian float has 4 bytes in BigEndian long has 8 bytes in BE and so on...

This will be kept up regardless of the underlying architecture, so using long on an 8 bit machine will seriously slow it down, because it has to work on 8x8 bits for one long.

However, the platform and architecture specific JVMs will try to optimize it as much as possible.

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Bytecode generated is platform independent. It doesnt make any difference if you run the same bytecode on 32 or 64 bit machine. Should behave exactly the same in most of the scenarios.

Unless you have native code (machine code compiled for a specific arcitechture), your code will run equally well in a 32-bit and 64-bit JVM i.e. it is platform independent

x = 10024 

int variable x is represented as a 32 bit fixed point value in both the architectures so there will not be any loss or unexpected behavior

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Java runs in a Java virtual machine (JVM) that can excute code. A JVM provides a run-time environment in which Java bytecode can be executed, enabling features such as automated exception handling, which provides root-cause debugging information for every software error (exception). A JVM is distributed along with Java Class Library, a set of standard class libraries (in Java bytecode) that implement the Java application programming interface (API). These libraries, bundled together with the JVM, form the Java Runtime Environment (JRE). JVMs are available for many hardware and software platforms. The use of the same bytecode for all JVMs on all platforms allows Java to be described as a write once, run anywhere programming language, versus write once, compile anywhere, which describes cross-platform compiled languages. Thus, the JVM is a crucial component of the Java platform. JVMs are most often implemented to run on an existing operating system, but can also be implemented to run directly on hardware. It is possible to make your own if you want, allowing you to port java anywhere. Source: Wikipedia

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