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Hi I am writing a stored procedure that will be executing a batch of jobs on an hourly schedule and I am trying to decide whether to return errors or raise them. Assuming I would be logging the errors inside each job which would lead to better performance and maintainability?

e.g.

--With Error Codes

CREATE PROCEDURE Job1
AS
BEGIN

    BEGIN TRY
        --Do some work
    END TRY
    BEGIN CATCH
        --log error
        RETURN 1; --Return 1 for error
    END CATCH
    RETURN 0;

END

CREATE PROCEDURE USP_BatchJob
AS
BEGIN
    BEGIN TRANSACTION;

    DECLARE @Error INT;
    EXEC @Error = Job1;
    IF @Error <> 0
        GOTO ErrorHandling;

    EXEC @Error = Job1;
    IF @Error <> 0
        GOTO ErrorHandling;

    IF @@TRANCOUNT > 0
        COMMIT TRANSACTION;

    RETURN;

ErrorHandling:
    IF @@TRANCOUNT > 0
        ROLLBACK;
END

e.g. RaiseError

CREATE PROCEDURE Job1
AS
BEGIN

    BEGIN TRY
        --Do some work
    END TRY
    BEGIN CATCH
        --log error
        RAISERROR(ERROR_MESSAGE(), ERROR_SEVERITY(), ERROR_STATE());
    END CATCH

END

CREATE PROCEDURE USP_BatchJob
AS
BEGIN
    BEGIN TRANSACTION
    BEGIN TRY

    EXEC Job1;

    EXEC Job1;

    END TRY
    BEGIN CATCH
        IF @@TRANCOUNT > 0
            ROLLBACK;
    END CATCH

    IF @@TRANCOUNT > 0
        COMMIT TRANSACTION;

END

The latter seems to produce more maintainable code

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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Being about coding style, this may be a religious issue. The main difference between a return code and an exception is that the exception will continue to be passed up the chain of calls.

In general, in the code that I write, I use return values to return the status of a stored procedure as an "application error". As with your example, 0 means success and anything else means failure. Whenever I call a stored procedure in real code, I have checks on the return value as well as any new errors that might arise. By the way, in SQL Server, you cannot check for failure with "@retval <> 0", because stored procedures can return NULL.

Of course, exceptions/database errors can still occur. The idea is that when an exception is recognized, it gets logged and handled. The system "error" turns into an application error.

The one issue I have encountered is the interaction with SQL Server Agent. For this, you want to raise an error to "fork" to the error handling step. This is easily done within a job step, by looking at the return value and then generating an error.

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‘…because stored procedures can return NULL’ – this statement appears to be incorrect. Judging by the SQL Server 2000 RETURN manual, as well as by the SQL Server 2012 one, stored procedures in SQL Server cannot return NULL. –  Andriy M Jan 28 '13 at 6:28
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