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I would like to generate a figure that has a combination of base and ggplot graphics. The following code shows my figure using the base plotting functions of R:

t <- c(1:(24*14)) 
P <- 24 
A <- 10 
y <- A*sin(2*pi*t/P)+20

par(mfrow=c(2,2))
plot(y,type = "l",xlab = "Time (hours)",ylab = "Amplitude",main = "Time series")
acf(y,main = "Autocorrelation",xlab = "Lag (hours)", ylab = "ACF")
spectrum(y,method = "ar",main = "Spectral density function", 
         xlab = "Frequency (cycles per hour)",ylab = "Spectrum")
require(biwavelet)
t1 <- cbind(t, y)
wt.t1=wt(t1)
plot(wt.t1, plot.cb=FALSE, plot.phase=FALSE,main = "Continuous wavelet transform",
     ylab = "Period (hours)",xlab = "Time (hours)")

Which generates enter image description here

Most of these panels look sufficient for me to include in my report. However, the plot showing the autocorrelation needs to be improved. This looks much better by using ggplot:

require(ggplot2)
acz <- acf(y, plot=F)
acd <- data.frame(lag=acz$lag, acf=acz$acf)
ggplot(acd, aes(lag, acf)) + geom_area(fill="grey") +
  geom_hline(yintercept=c(0.05, -0.05), linetype="dashed") +
  theme_bw()

enter image description here

However, seeing as ggplot is not a base graphic, we cannot combine ggplot with layout or par(mfrow). How could I replace the autocorrelation plot generated from the base graphics with the one generated by ggplot? I know I can use grid.arrange if all of my figures were made with ggplot but how do I do this if only one of the plots are generated in ggplot?

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2  
it might be almost as easy, and look more consistent, to use polygon with the output of acf() to construct a base-graphics plot that resembles the ggplot one. –  Ben Bolker Jan 2 '13 at 15:18
    
Thanks for our response. This question is really aimed at learning how to combine ggplot and base graphics in a figure window, I realize that there may be more efficient ways of generating the figure shown, but for future purposes I would like to learn the method specified. –  KatyB Jan 2 '13 at 15:21
3  
check out the gridBase package ... –  Ben Bolker Jan 2 '13 at 15:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 30 down vote accepted

Using gridBase package, you can do it just by adding 2 lines. I think if you want to do funny plot with the grid you need just to understand and master viewports. It is really the basic object of the grid package.

vps <- baseViewports()
pushViewport(vps$figure) ##   I am in the space of the autocorrelation plot

The baseViewports() function returns a list of three grid viewports. I use here figure Viewport A viewport corresponding to the figure region of the current plot.

Here how it looks the final solution:

enter image description here

library(gridBase)
par(mfrow=c(2, 2))
plot(y,type = "l",xlab = "Time (hours)",ylab = "Amplitude",main = "Time series")
plot(wt.t1, plot.cb=FALSE, plot.phase=FALSE,main = "Continuous wavelet transform",
     ylab = "Period (hours)",xlab = "Time (hours)")
spectrum(y,method = "ar",main = "Spectral density function", 
         xlab = "Frequency (cycles per hour)",ylab = "Spectrum")
## the last one is the current plot
plot.new()              ## suggested by @Josh
vps <- baseViewports()
pushViewport(vps$figure) ##   I am in the space of the autocorrelation plot
vp1 <-plotViewport(c(1.8,1,0,1)) ## create new vp with margins, you play with this values 
require(ggplot2)
acz <- acf(y, plot=F)
acd <- data.frame(lag=acz$lag, acf=acz$acf)
p <- ggplot(acd, aes(lag, acf)) + geom_area(fill="grey") +
  geom_hline(yintercept=c(0.05, -0.05), linetype="dashed") +
  theme_bw()+labs(title= "Autocorrelation\n")+
  ## some setting in the title to get something near to the other plots
  theme(plot.title = element_text(size = rel(1.4),face ='bold'))
print(p,vp = vp1)        ## suggested by @bpatiste
share|improve this answer
    
Yes I have tried this, the problem with this is that the plot generated with ggplot is much bigger than the other panels (as you can see above). Is there a method for changing this? –  KatyB Jan 2 '13 at 16:31
    
@Kate I upadte my answer. –  agstudy Jan 2 '13 at 16:40
    
+1 Very nice. If you replaced the call to acf(...) with a call to plot.new(), you'd avoid having to call grid.rect() to 'white-out' the acf plot. –  Josh O'Brien Jan 2 '13 at 17:42
    
Just b/c I came back and saw that you'd added this much simpler and cleverer answer. –  Josh O'Brien Jan 2 '13 at 17:51
    
@JoshO'Brien Thanks a lot! –  agstudy Jan 2 '13 at 17:56

You can use the print command with a grob and viewport.
First plot your base graphics then add the ggplot

library(grid)

# Let's say that P is your plot
P <- ggplot(acd, # etc... )

# create an apporpriate viewport.  Modify the dimensions and coordinates as needed
vp.BottomRight <- viewport(height=unit(.5, "npc"), width=unit(0.5, "npc"), 
                           just=c("left","top"), 
                           y=0.5, x=0.5)

# plot your base graphics 
par(mfrow=c(2,2))
plot(y,type #etc .... )

# plot the ggplot using the print command
print(P, vp=vp.BottomRight)
share|improve this answer
    
Hello Ricardo. Do you know how to control the widths of the plots with your method ? For instance I want a base graphic and a ggplot2 graphic side by side, but with a larger width for the base graphic. –  Stéphane Laurent Jan 16 '13 at 11:27
    
Hi Stéphane, you can accomplish this adjust the settings in the viewport() line. Specifically, you would want to adjust width and the y value, experimenting with different values until you get your desired results. –  Ricardo Saporta Jan 18 '13 at 6:01
    
Thank you Ricardo. Actually I have open a question here stackoverflow.com/questions/14358526/… –  Stéphane Laurent Jan 18 '13 at 8:12

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