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I have a hard time trying to figure out how to generate the arrangements via backtracking on python, it is something they asked us at university

A group of n (n<=10) persons, numbered from 1 to n are placed on a row of chairs, but between every two neighbor persons some conflict of interests appeared. Display all the possible modalities to replace the persons, such that between any two persons in conflict stays one or at most two other persons.

I managed to modify the code for the permutations and the queens but i don`t really know where to put the condition for example k is the number and k must be different from the previous number in the string +1 and must bee different from the next number+1

The list of person sitting on the chairs is 1 2 3 4 (is impossible for less then 3 persons) one right solution will be 1 3 4 2 and 3 1 4 2

Here is the code:

class Permutations(Backtracking):

    def __init__(self, n):
        Backtracking.__init__(self, n)

    def _init_value(self, k):
        return 0

    def _next_value(self, n, k, v):
        if v < n:
            return v + 1
        return None

    def _cond(self, k, possible, v):
        if v is None:
            return False
        try:
            possible[:k].index(v) 
            return False
        except ValueError:
            return True

    def _solution(self, n, k, possible):
        return k == n-1

    def _handle_solution(self, n, k, possible):
        print(possible)
share|improve this question
    
Homework? cs.ubbcluj.ro/~istvanc/fp/lab/Lab12.pdf – hughdbrown Jan 2 '13 at 16:37
2  
1 3 4 2 isn't possible, as 3 and 4 are adjacent. – Paul Hankin Jan 2 '13 at 16:42
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Code:

def possible_solution(remaining, sol=None):
    sol = sol or []
    if not remaining:
        yield sol
    else:
        for i, candidate in enumerate(remaining):
            if not sol or abs(sol[-1] - candidate) != 1:
                new_sol = sol + [candidate]
                new_remaining = remaining[:i] + remaining[i+1:]
                for x in possible_solution(new_remaining, new_sol):
                    yield x

Test code:

def possible_solutions(neighbors):
    for solution in possible_solution(neighbors):
        print solution

print '-' * 30
possible_solutions([1, 2, 3])

print '-' * 30
possible_solutions([1, 2, 3, 4])

print '-' * 30
possible_solutions([1, 2, 3, 4, 5])

Results:

------------------------------
------------------------------
[2, 4, 1, 3]
[3, 1, 4, 2]
------------------------------
[1, 3, 5, 2, 4]
[1, 4, 2, 5, 3]
[2, 4, 1, 3, 5]
[2, 4, 1, 5, 3]
[2, 5, 3, 1, 4]
[3, 1, 4, 2, 5]
[3, 1, 5, 2, 4]
[3, 5, 1, 4, 2]
[3, 5, 2, 4, 1]
[4, 1, 3, 5, 2]
[4, 2, 5, 1, 3]
[4, 2, 5, 3, 1]
[5, 2, 4, 1, 3]
[5, 3, 1, 4, 2]
share|improve this answer
    
this looks right but is not really a modify code like i did before, i know python is a high end language and from what i was told, and what i`ve read i thought that the cond function was where you put all the conditions... – JackRobinson Jan 3 '13 at 8:01
    
@JackRobinson: This is how I would write the solution in python. Even if I wanted to use your framework, I'd need to see how the Backtracking class works and how it is used. – hughdbrown Jan 3 '13 at 12:29
def chairs(soln, i=0):
    if i == len(soln):
        yield tuple(soln)
    for j in xrange(i, len(soln)):
        if i == 0 or soln[j] not in (soln[i - 1] + 1, soln[i - 1] - 1):
            soln[i], soln[j] = soln[j], soln[i]
            for s in chairs(soln, i + 1):
                yield s
            soln[i], soln[j] = soln[j], soln[i]

print list(chairs(range(1, 5)))
share|improve this answer
1  
(1) Using an integer to mark the last value in the proposed solution is problematic, e.g.: print list(chairs(set([-1, 0, 1, 2]), -1)). You end up having to change the value of this flag based on the data you are passing in. (2) Instead of removing from the set and adding back, you could pass in a new copy: for soln in chairs(remaining - set([r]), r):. I don't know why it is not a problem here, but it is dangerous to modify an iterable you are looping over. (3) Suggest: if r not in (prev + 1, prev - 1): – hughdbrown Jan 3 '13 at 19:23
    
Also, +1....... – hughdbrown Jan 3 '13 at 19:26
    
Thanks Hugh, I agree with your points (and +1'd). I found a way to do the whole thing in place, which avoids the problems you mentioned, and also avoids memory allocation (except when a solution is found), and takes out some of the O(n^2) set and list constructions. – Paul Hankin Jan 4 '13 at 13:19

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