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I have a string that with several parts separated by tabs:

 Hello\t2009-08-08\t1\t2009-08-09\t5\t2009-08-11\t15

I want to split it up only on the first tab, so that "Hello" ends up in $k and and rest ends up in $v. This doesn't quite work:

my ($k, $v) = split(/\t/, $string);

How can I do that?

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Actually, I just read the doc for split(), was baffled; googled, and came here. Where I found the answer. –  Chap Jan 25 '13 at 6:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 22 down vote accepted

In order to get that, you need to use the 3rd parameter to split(), which gives the function a maximum number of fields to split into (if positive):

my($first, $rest) = split(/\t/, $string, 2);
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What if the value's length is uncertain, and I want to capture all of it in $v. $v's format is going to look like date_1\tvalue_1\tdate_2\tvalue_2\tdate_3\tvalue_3... –  biznez Sep 11 '09 at 18:37
1  
This will capture "date_1" in $k, and "value_1\tdate_2\tvalue_2\tdate_3\tvalue_3..." in $v. For more information, I linked to the perldoc reference page on the split() function - it will explain how it works in all the detail you could ever want. I suggest you read it. Perldoc is very informative. –  Chris Lutz Sep 11 '09 at 18:39

Another option would be to use a simple regex.

my($k,$v) = $str =~ /([^\t]+)\t(.+)/;
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No. It will give you the first two items and toss the rest. Try this:

my ($k, $v) = split(/\t/, $string, 2);
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What if the value's length is uncertain, and I want to capture all of it in $v. $v's format is going to look like date_1\tvalue_1\tdate_2\tvalue_2\tdate_3\tvalue_3... –  biznez Sep 11 '09 at 18:36
    
Like Chris Lutz said in his comment, the number tells Perl how many parts to split into. So, with a value of 2, the first part goes in $v, the first \t in consumed in the split, and the remainder of the string goes unaltered into $v. –  Jeremy Bourque Sep 11 '09 at 18:44

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