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I have a website that uses MSMQ on a remote server to queue pending e-mails. I am able to write the message to the queue, and then call dispose on the queue. The queue still gets the message, but sometime later the GC comes along and tries to clean up and it causes IIS to crash. This is what I see in the event log:

Exception: System.NullReferenceException

Message: Object reference not set to an instance of an object.

StackTrace: at System.Messaging.Cursor.Finalize()

This code has been running fine for years, but it just started acting up recently. I have rebooting all the servers to troubleshoot it, but that does not help.

Edit 1

Here is the code that is sending the messages. QueueFactory is just a singleton that has a lock around creating a MessageQueue.

using (System.Messaging.MessageQueue queue
    = QueueFactory.Instance.BuildQueue(this.Path))
{
    System.Messaging.Message message = new System.Messaging.Message
    {
        Body = body,
        Formatter = new BinaryMessageFormatter(),
        TimeToBeReceived = this.ExpirationMinutes
    };

    queue.Send(message, label);
}

There is a try-catch around this code, and I know it never makes it into the catch block. I'm beginning to think this was caused when the entire application was upgraded from .NET 3.5 to .NET 4.0. However it started occurring sporadically, but now it happens every time I write a message to the queue.

Edit 2

Here is the code for BuildQueue

lock (lockHandler)
{
    return new System.Messaging.MessageQueue(queuePath);
}
share|improve this question
    
Might want to add more information like ... complete stack trace, source code that's queuing and disposing the queue. Seems like if you have garbage collection you don't need to be disposing objecting on your own. –  LastCoder Jan 2 '13 at 17:24
    
That is the entire stack trace, and I'm simply calling Send on a MessageQueue object, which has been constructed in an using block. I think it's pretty standard for disposed objects to be visited by the GC. –  goalie7960 Jan 2 '13 at 17:31
    
so is your exception happening on the sever that is queuing the messages or on the remote server that is reading them? From MSDN "A Cursor is used to maintain a specific location in a MessageQueue when reading the queue's messages." msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.messaging.cursor.aspx –  LastCoder Jan 2 '13 at 17:45
2  
If you look with reflector at Cursor Dispose on .NET 2 and .NET 4 assemblies, you will notice that has changed. The .NET 4 Dispose method version cannot raise a NullReferenceException while the .NET 2 can. You really want to make sure the code that's executing the source you show really uses .NET 4. –  Simon Mourier Jan 11 '13 at 8:47
1  
Uses ProcessExplorer to see what DLLs are loaded. You will need to run it as admin to see all of the processes. Find the one that is hosting MSMQ and then go to view\lower pane view\show DLLs. That should help you find out if the .net 2 DLL is loaded or not. –  Steve Jan 11 '13 at 14:10

2 Answers 2

Try using a transaction:

using (System.Messaging.MessageQueue queue
    = QueueFactory.Instance.BuildQueue(this.Path))
{
    System.Messaging.Message message = new System.Messaging.Message
    {
        Body = body,
        Formatter = new BinaryMessageFormatter(),
        TimeToBeReceived = this.ExpirationMinutes
    };

    MessageQueueTransaction transaction = new MessageQueueTransaction();

    try
    {
        transaction.Begin();
        queue.Send(message, label, transaction);
        transaction.Commit();
    }
    catch(System.Exception e)
    {
        transaction.Abort();
        throw e;
    }
    finally
    {
        transaction.Dispose();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That may or may not work, but I'd like to understand why this is happening all of a sudden. –  goalie7960 Jan 11 '13 at 15:00
    
There's a chance that the transaction might catch the error that the transactionless process doesn't. –  ic3b3rg Jan 11 '13 at 15:02
    
Message queues should be set up either specifically as transactional, or as non-transactional - if they're non-transactional your code will fail if you try to open a transaction on them. You can look at the queue in computer management to see if it is transactional. –  penguat Jan 11 '13 at 16:14
    
@penguat true... I should have mentioned that –  ic3b3rg Jan 11 '13 at 16:30

This is a very strange way of coding .. you are creating a message queue and then immediately disposing it- there's a chance that as you send the message to your message queue, it is not processed by the queue before it's disposed by reaching the end of your using block.. I'd try putting a while loop after your .send to check to see if it's finished processing or not before allowing it to dispose..

For more info on using message queues you should look into inverse of control.

hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Honestly I'm not sure what you are talking about. The Send method does what it says, it sends the message. What happens to the message after the queue receives it is not important to this problem. –  goalie7960 Feb 6 '13 at 14:20
    
The point is your queue is being disposed of at a strange time and that could be causing your issue. Did you check to see if this was the case, or did you just -1 because you didn't understand and needed clarification? –  Izzy Feb 6 '13 at 14:53
    
Considering that Send is a blocking call, I would assume that the message is property sent before returning. I downvoted because it's clearly not a "strange" way of coding. –  goalie7960 Feb 6 '13 at 16:37
    
It's strange because usually you send a dispose message to the queue and let it manage it's own dispose, rather than send it a single message and then dispose of its handle. If there's a legitimate reason for doing this then fine, but don't fall into the "old shoe or glass bottle" problem... weblogs.asp.net/alex_papadimoulis/archive/2005/05/25/… –  Izzy Feb 6 '13 at 17:37
    
At this point I don't understand what you are talking about. If you have legitimate information that disposing the queue will cause this behavior, then it's a realistic answer that should be upvoted. Otherwise you're speculating about some magical way to "send a dispose message to the queue". –  goalie7960 Feb 6 '13 at 18:01

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