Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Hi! I hava a list of lists, and when the first element of the sublists are equal, i need to add the second elements of those and print the results. I have thought about it for long, but i just can't seem to figure out how this could be done. Here's an example of my problem:

num_list = [[1, 2], [3, 4], [1, 2], [3, 4], [3, 4]]

# 0th and 2nd sublists both have 1 as their first element.
# sum = 2 + 2. print out 4.

# all the remaining sublists have 3 as their first element.
# sum = 4 + 4 + 4. print out 12. 

Thank you very much!

PS: I'm aware that this kind of mapping would be better done with a dictionary, but this is just a simplified version of my problem. My actual program has sublists that have more than 2 values and i need to compare more than 1 value that need to be equal.

share|improve this question
1  
Can you describe your full problem? –  Blender Jan 2 '13 at 17:32
1  
Sort them and use itertools.groupby –  JBernardo Jan 2 '13 at 17:34
    
The actual lists in my problem are like the following: ['42x120x1800', 50, '50x90x800', 60], ['42x120x1800', 8, '50x90x800', 10]. And if the strings are equal, add the 1st elements of both lists and print, and add the last element of both lists and print. –  geekkid Jan 2 '13 at 17:41

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It seems that you did not describe your problem quite accurate enough.
Your real problem can only be grasped from your comments on both the question and the answer from @Blender. His nice solution for the problem works not immediately for what I understand is your problem case, ... but almost.

Here's a way to extend to suit your needs:

# some toy example data - I understand you want the first 2 sub_list
# to be "merged" because BOTH strings in pos 0 and 2 match
data = [['42x120x1800', 50, '50x90x800', 60],
        ['42x120x1800', 8, '50x90x800', 10],
        ['2x10x800', 5, '5x9x80', 6]]


from collections import defaultdict

# I'm using a lambda to initialize the items of the dict
# to a two-element list of zeros
d = defaultdict(lambda :[0, 0])
for sub_list in data:
    key = (sub_list[0], sub_list[2])
    d[key][0] += sub_list[1]
    d[key][1] += sub_list[3]

for key in d:
    print key, d[key]   
# ('2x10x800', '5x9x80') [5, 6]
# ('42x120x1800', '50x90x800') [58, 70]

If you then want to go back to the initial representation of the data:

new_data = [[key[0], val[0], key[1], val[1]] for key, val in d.iteritems()]
# [['2x10x800', 5, '5x9x80', 6], ['42x120x1800', 58, '50x90x800', 70]]
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you all for your help! I'm sorry i didn't describe my problem as it is. I thought that when i describe the problem too specifical to my program , the topic gets shut down :D. –  geekkid Jan 4 '13 at 15:10

You can use defaultdict:

from collections import defaultdict

num_list = [[1, 2], [3, 4], [1, 2], [3, 4], [3, 4]]

d = defaultdict(int)

for item in num_list:
    d[item[0]] += item[1]

And the results are:

>>> d
defaultdict(<type 'int'>, {1: 4, 3: 12})
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, this way you iterate only once, code is pretty clean, etc.. +1 –  redShadow Jan 2 '13 at 17:39
    
Thank you. I'm sorry, it's the first time i heard about defaultdict. What can i do with the results ? For example, how can i assign the 4 and 12 in your example to variables ? –  geekkid Jan 2 '13 at 17:48
    
@geekkid You can treat it just like a regular dict. –  Ismail Badawi Jan 2 '13 at 17:49
    
But if i have a lists of the following format : num_list = [['12x15x600', 2, '15x17x800', 4], ['12x15x600', 10, '15x17x800', 12]]. Is your solution still doable ? What i need is to add the integers in the same position if the -->both<-- strings are equal to strings in the other list in the same position. In this example, i need to add 2 + 10 and 4 + 12. –  geekkid Jan 2 '13 at 17:57
    
@geekkid: Try it out first. As long as they first elements are the same, the second elements in the list will add together. As I said before, don't simplify your problem so much. You'll get answers, but to the wrong problem. –  Blender Jan 2 '13 at 23:47

You can still use a dictonary for this task. Use tuples as keys:

>>> d = {(1,1): (2,2), (3,3): (4,4)}
>>> d
{(1, 1): (2, 2), (3, 3): (4, 4)}
>>> d[(1,1)]
(2, 2)

You might also want to learn about the Counter class. If your elements are more complex, I suggest wrapping them in objects and implement the __add__ method to customize how they're added together.

from collections import Counter
c = Counter()
c[(1,1)] = 10
c[(2,2)] = 10
c[(1,1)] += 1

c2 = Counter()
c2[(2,2)] = 4
c2[(2,3)] = 5

Which gives:

>>> c 
Counter({(1, 1): 11, (2, 2): 10})
>>> c + c2
Counter({(2, 2): 14, (1, 1): 11, (2, 3): 5})

Note that you cannot use Lists as keys, as lists are mutable and thus unhashable. You have to use tuples.

share|improve this answer
    
But, how can the problem be solved when instead of lists, dictionaries are used? –  geekkid Jan 2 '13 at 17:43
    
You can put whatever you want in the values of the counter, it just needs to implement __add__ and __sub__. In the keys, you need hashable values (i.e. tuples, numbers, …) however. This should give you the most flexible solution. –  Jonas Wielicki Jan 2 '13 at 17:45

Using standard dict():

num_list = [[1, 2], [3, 4], [1, 2], [3, 4], [3, 4]]

d = dict()
for e in num_list:
    #get() checks if key exists, if not - returns 0        
    d[e[0]] = d.get(e[0], 0) + e[1]

print(d)

It prints:

{1: 4, 3: 12}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.