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I've met a memory leak problem with pyodbc. It took me a lot of time to track down. Finally I got the piece of code where memory leak happens.

import pyodbc
conn = pyodbc.connect(myconnstr)
cur = conn.cursor()
for i in range(1000000):
    print i
    cur.execute('select * from test.aa;')
    cur.fetchall()
    cur.commit()

If I run this code, it slowly eat up memory at about 5mb/sec. However, if I remove the last line like in below, it won't leak memory. Closing the cursor and the connection in iteration does not help. If the memory leak happened, closing the cursor and the connection won't get the memory back.

import pyodbc
conn = pyodbc.connect(myconnstr)
cur = conn.cursor()
for i in range(1000000):
    print i
    cur.execute('select * from test.aa;')
    cur.fetchall()

However, if I replace the select with a insert statement, it doesn't leak memory:

import pyodbc
conn = pyodbc.connect(myconnstr)
cur = conn.cursor()
for i in range(1000000):
    print i
    cur.execute('insert into test.aa values(1);')
    cur.commit()

I tried using guppy to track down the leak, but it doesn't help. Using hpy().heap() gives these results:

Partition of a set of 286322 objects. Total size = 22433376 bytes.
 Index  Count   %     Size   % Cumulative  % Kind (class / dict of class)
     0 115601  40  8825424  39   8825424  39 str
     1  69891  24  3030424  14  11855848  53 tuple
     2   1921   1  1352588   6  13208436  59 dict (no owner)
     3   1074   0  1349016   6  14557452  65 dict of PyQt4.QtCore.pyqtWrapperType
     4    477   0  1189980   5  15747432  70 dict of module
     5  12326   4   887472   4  16634904  74 types.CodeType
     6  12178   4   730680   3  17365584  77 function
     7   1162   0   565496   3  17931080  80 dict of type
     8   1162   0   523384   2  18454464  82 type
     9   1074   0   502632   2  18957096  85 PyQt4.QtCore.pyqtWrapperType
<1140 more rows. Type e.g. '_.more' to view.>

It said only 22mb memory is taken up but actually the python process used about 500mb at the moment.

I'm using 32bit python 2.7.2 (coming with Python(x,y) 2.7.2.3), and manually installed pyodbc 32bit 3.0.6 using the .exe installer. Oh and I'm using MySQL 5.5.17 32bit.

Have anyone met this problem before? Any comments are most appreciated. Many thanks!

Oh I forgot to tell that the reason I commit after a select statement is that I'm writing a wrapper for sql operations. I can't tell from statement if it's a select or a insert, so I fetch and commit for every statement, just to be sure everything is done. If there is a good way to tell among select/insert/update/show, I think I can avoid this memory leak problem.

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May want to file an issue here for developer to review. –  Bryan Eargle Jan 2 '13 at 17:44

1 Answer 1

I haven't found a fix but did find a workaround. I was experiencing the problem on only some of our machines. With the help of your code snippet, I was able to narrow down which ones these were and then noticed that all the ones it did occur on where using version 5.2 of the MySQL ODBC connector, while the ones it didn't leak on where using 5.1. This happened on both Windows and Linux.

Downgrading to 5.1 on the machines with the leak appears to have solved (or at least avoided) the problem.

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