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I'm trying to get the hang of iterators, I'd post the failed attempts but I don't see a point so I'll just post the code that I'm trying to rewrite with iterators.

How can I make the class use the vector's iterator to keep track of the position instead of making my own makeshift iterators?

Specifically I'm trying to keep track of what letters have already been printed inside a fixed loop.

Live Code

This is the expected output.

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#include <vector>
#include <cstdio>

class ABC
{

protected:

   std::vector<char> ABCs;

   int currentLetter;

public:

   ABC():currentLetter( 0 ){}

   void AddLetter( char Letter )
   {
       ABCs.push_back( Letter );
   }

   char getLetter( int position )
   {
       return ABCs.at( position );
   }

   int getLetterPosition()
   {
       return currentLetter;
   }

   void setLetterPosition( int newPosition )
   {
       currentLetter = newPosition;
   }

};

void printSentence( ABC * alphabet, int limit )
{
   for( int i = 0; i < limit; i += 2 )
   {
       printf( "The current letter is %c, the letter after is %c \n", alphabet->getLetter( alphabet->getLetterPosition() ), alphabet->getLetter( alphabet->getLetterPosition() + 1 ) );

       alphabet->setLetterPosition( alphabet->getLetterPosition() + 2 );
   }
}

int main()
{
    ABC alphabet;
    ABC * alphabetPointer = &alphabet;

    for( char letter = 'a'; letter < 'z'; letter++  )
    {
         alphabet.AddLetter( letter );
    }

    printf( "%s\n" , "printSentence() with param of four letters." );
    printSentence( alphabetPointer, 4 );

    //again
    printf( "%s\n" , "printSentence() with param of six letters." );
    printSentence( alphabetPointer, 6 );

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
To clarify: you want to iterate over an ABC object, like a vector object? –  soon Jan 2 '13 at 17:46
    
@soon Instead of using my makeshift alphabet->getLetterPosition() etc functions to keep track of the letters that have been printed, I'd like to use something like a std::vector::iterator instead. –  Tek Jan 2 '13 at 17:48

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What you can do is typedef a const-iterator to your own vector, like this:

class ABC
{
public:
   typedef std::vector<char> CharCollection;
   typedef typename CharCollection::const_iterator const_iterator;

protected:
   CharCollection ABCs;
   int currentLetter;
   ...

Your class will now have a type called "const_iterator".

Next step is to allow users of your class to iterate over it. Simply implement a begin() and end() method, like this:

public:
    const_iterator begin()  const {return ABCs.begin();}
    const_iterator end()    const {return ABCs.end();  }
    const_iterator cbegin() const {return ABCs.begin();}
    const_iterator cend()   const {return ABCs.end();  }

Notice that I also implemented the new C++ cbegin and cend methods.

It's important to use a const-iterator here. You don't want callers to change your collection behind your back.

Now you can loop over it like this:

ABC abc;
...
for (ABC::const_iterator it=abc.begin();it!=abc.end();++it)
   {
   char c = *it;
   ...
   }

You can also use auto here instead of ABC::const_iterator.

There are some pitfalls here:

  • If the vector in your ABC class is extended, the iterators pointing to might will become invalid. So you should clearly document that users of your class must not call any method that extends the vector when iterating over it.
  • You can only have one begin and one end method. So if you add more vectors to your ABC class, you have to write methods like beginABC, beginXYZ, ... and the same for end.

Because of this, I prefer in general not to write it this way, and to expose the vector as a whole to the user of the class, like this:

class ABC
{
public:
   typedef std::vector<char> CharCollection;
   const CharCollection &getABCs() const {return ABCs;}

That way, it becomes clearer for the caller that he can get the collection, but he cannot change it (it's const) and that it will become invalid if something changes in the ABC class (because it returns a reference).

Now the caller can choose whatever he wants to do with the collection:

  • iterate over it using CharCollection::begin() and end()
  • make a copy of it if he needs to change the ABC class instance while looping over it
  • or use any other STL method that can work on a collection
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