Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm writing a simple calculator in SML , and my code need to support 3 kinds of parentheses :

( ) 

[ ] 

{ } 

Where inside { } , can appear { } , [ ] , ( ) expressions ,

Inside [ ] , can appear [ ] , ( ) expressions ,

And inside ( ) , can appear only ( ) expressions .

Meaning is , that { } has the highest priority , the [ ] - the middle priority , and ( ) has the lowest priority .

What would be the best approach for accomplishing that ?

I've written a big method with too much loops and recursions that runs on separate cases , but I don't think this is the best approach .

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated

Regards

EDIT :

The relevant code :

signature CalculatorOperation = sig
  datatype token = 
                    (* paranthesis *)

                   Lpar3             (* { *)
                 | Rpar3             (* } *)
                 | Lpar2             (* [ *)
                 | Rpar2             (* ] *)  
                 | Lpar              (* ( *)
                 | Rpar              (* ) *)

the structure :

structure CalculatorOperation : CalculatorOperation = struct 
  datatype token =
                    (* paranthesis *)

                   Lpar3             (* { *)
                 | Rpar3             (* } *)
                 | Lpar2             (* [ *)
                 | Rpar2             (* ] *)  
                 | Lpar              (* ( *)
                 | Rpar              (* ) *)

Scanner :

 fun stringScanner s [] = (toToken s,[])
    | stringScanner s (c::l)
      = case c::l of
          #" "::r => if s = "" then (stringScanner "" l) else (toToken s,l)
        (* paranthesis *)

        | #"{"::r => if s = "" then (Lpar3,r) else (toToken s,c::l)
        | #"}"::r => if s = "" then (Rpar3,r) else (toToken s,c::l)     
        | #"["::r => if s = "" then (Lpar2,r) else (toToken s,c::l)
        | #"]"::r => if s = "" then (Rpar2,r) else (toToken s,c::l)
        | #"("::r => if s = "" then (Lpar,r) else (toToken s,c::l)
        | #")"::r => if s = "" then (Rpar,r) else (toToken s,c::l)

Parser :

structure CalculatorParser : CalculatorParser = struct
  open CalculatorOperation

  exception CalculatorParser

  datatype expr = NumNode of int
               | UminusNode of expr
               | MultiplyNode of expr * expr
               | DivNode of expr * expr
               | PlusNode of expr * expr
               | MinusNode of expr * expr
               | ModuloNode of expr * expr
               | PowerNode of expr * expr                          





  fun parserBrackets l = parserHelper2 l
  and parserHelper l
      = case l of 
          (Num n)::l1 => (NumNode n,l1)
        | Lpar3::l1 => let val (en,l2) = parserBrackets l1  in case l2 of Rpar3::l3 => (en,l3)
        | _ => raise CalculatorParser end

        | Lpar2::l1 => let val (en,l2) = parserBrackets l1 in case l2 of Rpar2::l3 => (en,l3)
        | _ => raise CalculatorParser end   

        | Lpar::l1 => let val (en,l2) = parserBrackets l1 in case l2 of Rpar::l3 => (en,l3)
        | _ => raise CalculatorParser end   
share|improve this question
1  
Which parsing technique is being used? With a recursive-descent parser (which is my standard go-to) it's merely the ordering of traversal and adding precedence to parenthesis is no different than adding precedence to operators (and it's actually easier because the parenthesis precedence can be treated as association if they all otherwise have the same precedence) .. also show the [relevant] code –  user166390 Jan 2 '13 at 18:20
1  
(Oops, with the restrictions it couldn't use association - skipped that detail - but it's the same idea. Mock the EBNF. Turn into recursive functions. Win. Also, most calculators support arbitrary nested parenthesis .. artificial restriction?) –  user166390 Jan 2 '13 at 18:26
    
@pst: The code is attached (see edited post .. thanks :)) –  ron Jan 2 '13 at 18:42
    
Would you provide some examples of formulas using the different parenthesis types? I'm especially interested in seeing formulas that are identical, except for the different parenthesis types and how they would produce different results. –  RonaldBarzell Jan 4 '13 at 22:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I am not an SML expert, but from your description I gather that the syntactical rules you are looking for could be expressed in BNF as follows:

<expr1> ::= '{' ( <expr1> | <expr2> ) '}'

<expr2> ::= '[' ( <expr2> | <expr3> ) ']'

<expr3> ::= '(' ( <expr3> | <expr> ) ')' 

When I look at your definition of the datatype expr it seems to me that you could define similar types for expr1, expr2 and expr3 as follows:

datatype expr3 = E3Node of expr3
              | ENode of expr

datatype expr2 = E2Node of expr2
              | E3Node of expr3

datatype expr1 = E1Node of expr1
              | E2Node of expr2

Honestly, I don't even know if this is valid SML, but I am sure you would be able to fix that ... and fill in the gaps.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.