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I'm trying to get the list of defined operators for a specific type in order to see what kind of operations can be applied to that type.

For example, the type Guid supports operations == and !=.

So if user wants to apply <= operation for a Guid type I can handle this situation before an exception occurs.

Or if I could have the list of operators, I can force user to use only operations in the list.

The operators are seen in the object browser so there may be a way to access them via reflection but I couldn't find that way.

Any help will be appreciated.

share|improve this question
up vote 10 down vote accepted

Get the methods with Type.GetMethods, then use MethodInfo.IsSpecialName to discover operators, conversions etc. Here's an example:

using System;
using System.Reflection;

public class Foo
{
    public static Foo operator +(Foo x, Foo y)
    {
        return new Foo();
    }

    public static implicit operator string(Foo x)
    {
        return "";
    }
}

public class Example 
{

    public static void Main()
    {
        foreach (MethodInfo method in typeof(Foo).GetMethods())
        {
            if (method.IsSpecialName)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(method.Name);
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
hi, thanks for the quick reply! i think that works for most of the types but when i try Int32 it returns an empty set. any suggestion? – Cankut Sep 11 '09 at 19:26
2  
Yes, operators on primitive types are "funny" like that. I suspect you'd have to hard-code a list of them, basically. Don't forget that primitives don't include decimal, DateTime, TimeSpan or Guid`. – Jon Skeet Sep 11 '09 at 19:28
    
thanks very much :) – Cankut Sep 11 '09 at 19:30
    
Just for completeness, the "lifted" operators on Nullable<T> would also qualify as "funny" ;-p – Marc Gravell Sep 11 '09 at 22:41

C# 4.0 has dynamic language runtime feature, so how about using the dynamic type?

using Microsoft.CSharp.RuntimeBinder;

namespace ListOperatorsTest
{
class Program
{
    public static void ListOperators(object inst)
    {
        dynamic d = inst;

        try
        {
            var eq = d == d; // Yes, IntelliSense gives a warning here.
            // Despite this code looks weird, it will do
            // what it's supposed to do :-)
            Console.WriteLine("Type {0} supports ==", inst.GetType().Name);

        }
        catch (RuntimeBinderException)
        {
        }

        try
        {
            var eq = d <= d;
            Console.WriteLine("Type {0} supports <=", inst.GetType().Name);

        }
        catch (RuntimeBinderException)
        {
        }

        try
        {
            var eq = d < d;
            Console.WriteLine("Type {0} supports <", inst.GetType().Name);

        }
        catch (RuntimeBinderException)
        {
        }

        try
        {
            var add = d + d;
            Console.WriteLine("Type {0} supports +", inst.GetType().Name);
        }
        catch (RuntimeBinderException)
        {
        }

        try
        {
            var sub = d - d;
            Console.WriteLine("Type {0} supports -", inst.GetType().Name);
        }
        catch (RuntimeBinderException)
        {
        }

        try
        {
            var mul = d * d;
            Console.WriteLine("Type {0} supports *", inst.GetType().Name);
        }
        catch (RuntimeBinderException)
        {
        }

        try
        {
            try
            {
                var div = d / d;
            }
            catch (DivideByZeroException)
            {
            }
            Console.WriteLine("Type {0} supports /", inst.GetType().Name);
        }
        catch (RuntimeBinderException)
        {
        }
    }

    private struct DummyStruct
    {
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        ListOperators(0);
        ListOperators(0.0);
        DummyStruct ds;
        ListOperators(ds);
        ListOperators(new Guid());
    }
}
}
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