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I'm working in a team of developers on a Visual Studio 2010 solution. We are using TFS and the Source Control that comes with that.

I can't check in something that won't compile.

I am needing to add some existing projects to the solution from another solution. First I need to add them to this solution, then fix some references and namespaces so the solution will compile, then check all that as a completed unit of work back into Source Control.

I copied the existing projects' folders into the solution's folder first (in the OS, not in VS).

What is happening, is that when I add the existing projects to the solution, it only adds a node for the project, with a plus icon for Source Control. It ignores these items in the compile. The code files for the added projects are not yet actually in the solution. I can't fix anything at this point.

The only way it seems Visual Studio is giving me to proceed is to check in the newly added projects to Source Control, then make my fixes, then do another check in for the fixes.

This is not cool because it would break the solution in Source Control and my team mates' code. Plus checking in creates an automated build. It's a big deal.

Is there a work around? Thanks!

EDIT: I added the projects by dragging and dropping the csproj files from the OS into the Solution Explorer. They show up as file names, not as project names, along with the .csproj file extension. It's as if Visual Studio thinks I wanted to add the files, not the projects.

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Are the newly-added projects checked out by someone else? –  Robert Harvey Jan 2 '13 at 19:32
    
@RobertHarvey, Nope. They are brand new copies of existing projects that do not exist in the TFS Source Control tree yet. We are not doing a branch or anything. We are copying / pasting these projects into the new solution. Note my edit to my question. Thanks. –  toddmo Jan 2 '13 at 19:36
    
Do they compile on their own? Add the existing projects to their own solution, and bring that into TFS first. Then integrate them with the existing solution. –  Robert Harvey Jan 2 '13 at 20:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would highly suggest you speak to an existing team member to get some help on how to attach existing projects to your solution.

A few generalities though:

I copied the existing projects' folders into the solution's folder first (in the OS, not in VS).

Typically, this is NOT the way to do things. Normally you don't just copy another projects folder into yours. Either you simply attach that project to your solution from its existing location OR it gets branched into your own solution structure. Either way copying it around breaks the source control links which is usually not the desired behavior.

EDIT: I added the projects by dragging and dropping the csproj files from the OS into the Solution Explorer. They show up as file names, not as project names, along with the .csproj file extension. It's as if Visual Studio thinks I wanted to add the files, not the projects.

To add an existing project to your solution right click on the solution and select Add -> Existing project... All you've done is added a FILE to your project which has no meaning; that won't work.

The only way it seems Visual Studio is giving me to proceed is to check in the newly added projects to Source Control, then make my fixes, then do another check in for the fixes.

I'm not sure why you think this. Either the solution compiles or it doesn't. Checking it into source control will not impact this. Most likely the compilation problems are due to issues I identified above.

Either way, talk to an existing team member (or manager) to help you properly set up your solution. It's going to be the easiest way. I know that if one of my guys was having problems with TFS I would much rather they speak to me early so that I could show them how it works.

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Thanks. I wasn't saying that I thought I had to check in before I could fix code. I was saying I thought I would had to check in before I could see any source code files. But after doing it the way you suggested, that behavior I described went away. –  toddmo Jan 3 '13 at 17:07
    
In summary, Visual Studio is dumb to think anyone would ever want to add a project file as a file, as the default drag n drop operation. I hope we can agree what it did was counter-intuitive and violated the principle of least astonishment. –  toddmo Jan 3 '13 at 17:08
    
@toddmo: Yes, I agree that if you drag and drop a .csproj file into your solution then it should be smart enough to figure out what to do with it. ;) –  Chris Lively Jan 3 '13 at 23:02

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