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I am writing a C# application to communicate via serial to a microcontroller. I have a few questions on how to handle received messages. Below is the code that I am using at the moment, It received the messages perfectly fine, but I cannot update the Form, or store the data anywhere outside of this method (because it is in another thread).

com.DataReceived += new SerialDataReceivedEventHandler(OnReceived);


public void OnReceived(object sender, SerialDataReceivedEventArgs c) // This is started in another thread...
    {
        com.DiscardOutBuffer();
        try
        {
            test = com.ReadExisting();
            MessageBox.Show(test);       
        }
        catch (Exception exc) 
        {
            MessageBox.Show(exc.ToString());
        }
    }

When I attempt to alter the Form, or call another method from here this is the error message I receive: "Cross Thead operation not valid".

I would like to be able to display the information elsewhere or even better yet place it into an array to later be stored as a file. Is there any way I can do this?

Thanks again!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to invoke on the main thread using Invoke or BeginInvoke:

public void OnReceived(object sender, SerialDataReceivedEventArgs c)
{
    if (this.InvokeRequired)
    {
        this.BeginInvoke(new EventHandler<SerialDataReceivedEventArgs>(OnReceived), sender, c);
        return;
    }

    com.DiscardOutBuffer();
    try
    {
        test = com.ReadExisting();
        MessageBox.Show(test);       
    }
    catch (Exception exc) 
    {
        MessageBox.Show(exc.ToString());
    }
}

Or you can factor out part of the event handler (like showing a message box) and invoke that instead.

share|improve this answer
    
This worked perfectly, thank you! What does invoking accomplish? –  Bubo Jan 2 '13 at 19:40
    
@VRKnight it tells the main (GUI) thread to execute your code, rather than the background thread. Only the GUI thread is allowed to modify the GUI (like by showing a message box), so this is necessary. –  Jon B Jan 2 '13 at 19:41

The issue you have is that you are trying to update the UI from an non-ui thread. What you need to do is invoke your MessageBox call on the UI thread.

Something like:

public void OnReceived(object sender, SerialDataReceivedEventArgs c) // This is started in another thread...
{
    com.DiscardOutBuffer();
    try
    {
        test = com.ReadExisting();
        SetValue(test);       
    }
    catch (Exception exc) 
    {
        SetValue(exc.ToString());
    }
}


delegate void valueDelegate(string value);

private void SetValue(string value)
{   
    if (this.InvokeRequired)
    {
        this.Invoke(new valueDelegate(SetValue),value);
    }
    else
    {
        MessageBox.Show(value);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Both of these answers work, what exactly does it mean to Invoke? –  Bubo Jan 2 '13 at 19:39
    
Here's a little reading on it, but basically, it means to execute the requested code on the thread that the UI control owns or belongs to. Techincally you CAN do what you want without invoking (by disabling a debugger setting) but it's unsafe, so the invocation ensures proper execution across threads. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/zyzhdc6b.aspx –  Grant H. Jan 2 '13 at 19:42

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