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    [Serializable]
    public class GraphViewModel : ViewModelBase
    {    
        public GraphViewModel()
        {
            //Constructor
        }

        public bool bool1 { get; set; }
        public bool bool2 { get; set; }
        public bool bool3 { get; set; }
        public ObservableCollection<Foo> Foos { get; set; }
    }

With my sample class above, I can serialize and insert into binary database field no problem. When I deserialize, everything works, but is very slow (anywhere from 3 to 25 seconds). Note: there are only 5 items in the list.

I have narrowed down the problem to the ObservableCollection. When I set attribute [XmlIgnore], the speed of the deserialize is very good, because the list is not included in the xml output.

I would prefer to use the ObservableCollection and improve my setup to handle this scenario more efficiently, but cannot find the solution online.

EDIT: I have tried the following attributes:

[XmlArray(ElementName = "Foos")]
[XmlArrayItem(ElementName = "Foo")]
public ObservableCollection<Foo> Foos { get; set; }

It makes the Xml more readable, but does not improve the deserialize speed.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The deserialization speed is most likely due to the events that the observable collection raises.

What I do in situations like these is mark the offending property as XMLIgnore and then add a pseudo property that is serializable, but of a simpler type, such as a List<>. In the getter and setter of the new property, just move the data in and out of the non-serializable property.

EDIT:

I realized that the initial suggestion would have the same performance penalty as the current deserialization does, so I have revised the concept to allow adding a range of records to the observable collection while suppressing the events that would otherwise be raised.

First, we need to create a special class that inherits from ObservableCollection:

public class FooCollection : ObservableCollection<Foo>
{
}

within this class, we need to add a method that allows us to add a range of records, in this case in List<> form and indicate that we do not want notifications to occur while we are adding the records:

    private bool m_fSuppressNotifications;

    public void AddRange(List<Foo> cItems)
    {
        if ((cItems == null) || (cItems.Count == 0)) {
            this.Clear();
        } else {
            try
            {
                // Keep events from being fired
                m_fSuppressNotifications = true;
                foreach (var oFoo in cItems)
                {
                    this.Add(oFoo);
                }
            }
            finally
            {
                m_fSuppressNotifications = false;
                // Raise the event to notify any listeners that the data has changed
                this.OnCollectionChanged(new NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs(NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Reset))
            }
        }
    }

Finally, we need to override the CollectionChanged-related elements and either suppress or manually execute the associated events:

    public override event NotifyCollectionChangedEventHandler CollectionChanged;

    protected override void OnCollectionChanged(NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        // Prevent infinite loop that could occur if handler changes the collection
        using (BlockReentrancy())
        {
            if (!m_fSuppressNotifications)
            {
                // Get the current event
                var oCollectionChangedEvent = this.CollectionChanged;
                if (oCollectionChangedEvent != null)
                {
                    foreach (EventHandler oHandler in oCollectionChangedEvent.GetInvocationList())
                    {
                        // Execute the handler
                        oHandler(this, e);
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }

Finally, we need to change the implementation inside GraphViewModel slightly in order to suppress the serialization of the FooCollection and add a serializable List<> property:

public class GraphViewModel
{
    [XmlIgnore]
    public FooCollection Foos { get; set; }

    [XmlArray(ElementName = "Foos")]
    [XmlArrayItem(ElementName = "Foo")]
    public List<Foo> FoosSerializable
    {
        get
        {
            return this.Foos.ToList<Foo>();
        }
        set
        {
            this.Foos.AddRange(value);
        }
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Am implementing the concept now. –  faldeland Jan 2 '13 at 19:54
1  
@faldeland: I have updated the answer with a much better approach that should substantially improve performance. –  competent_tech Jan 2 '13 at 20:46
    
I look forward to implementing this tomorrow... –  faldeland Jan 3 '13 at 21:28

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