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I have a piece of code that runs perfectly most of the time, but every once in awhile I get this error in the traceback:

File "/path/to/somefile.py", line 272, in somefile
    sm = -0.5 * (wv[0]**2. / sm2 + numpy.log(2. * numpy.pi * sm2))
TypeError: issubclass() arg 2 must be a class or tuple of classes

I know what issubclass() does and understand the error, but I never called it; that line in the code is pure arithmetic, so I don't know why this TypeError is raised in the first place. My only theory is that Numpy is calling it behind the scenes, but then the traceback should show the problematic line in the Numpy source, right? What's going on?

Updates:

wv is an array of floats and sm2 is a float scalar. The error is actually thrown by numpy.log, i.e. the (new) line

tmp = numpy.log(2. * numpy.pi * sm2)

No more information is provided in the error message, though.

More updates:

My current version of Numpy (from a Python prompt):

>>> import numpy
>>> numpy.__version__
'1.6.2'

I changed the problem line to

try:
    tmp = numpy.log(2. * numpy.pi * sm2)
except TypeError:
    print type(sm2), 2. * numpy.pi * sm2

and got the output

<type 'numpy.float64'> 0.0

So it makes sense that there would be some kind of error, but if I do this (at a Python prompt)

>>> import numpy
>>> numpy.log(0.)

I get the error I would expect (and am already handling in the code in question, via the warning module):

__main__:1: RuntimeWarning: divide by zero encountered in log
-inf
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2  
You don't say what each var is, but you can break this statement into small pieces to see where the error happens (probably on numpy.log) –  JBernardo Jan 2 '13 at 19:57
    
@JBernardo is right—but you're almost certainly going to need to know (and tell us) what sm2 (and possibly wv) is in order to solve this problem. So please, do both of his suggestions, not just the second one. (If you don't know what type they are, just print them out right before this line.) –  abarnert Jan 2 '13 at 20:01
    
@JBernardo and @abarnert, I've updated with the types of the variables and split the line so that numpy.log is executed first, then added on the next line; the error is actually thrown by numpy.log but the last traceback line is still in my code, not Numpy's. –  nosuchthingasstars Jan 2 '13 at 20:17
    
If issubclass() is being called from C code, the traceback won't reflect that. I'd try catching that exception, and when it happens, see what 2. * numpy.pi * sm2 is. If that's not fruitful, I guess you are digging in the numpy source. –  Phil Frost Jan 2 '13 at 20:28
1  
I'll report it. Also, I just found this, which I never thought to look for before. It seems that Numpy has a way of handling RuntimeWarning internally, so I'll see if I can use that instead. Thanks for all your help in solving this! –  nosuchthingasstars Jan 2 '13 at 22:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This was an error in my code after all... As @seberg points out, this code works normally:

>>> import numpy
>>> import warnings
>>> numpy.log(0.)
__main__:1: RuntimeWarning: divide by zero encountered in log
-inf
>>> warnings.simplefilter("error", RuntimeWarning)    # not "RuntimeWarning"
>>> try:
...     numpy.log(0.)
... except RuntimeWarning:
...     print "caught"
...
caught

numpy.seterr provides an alternative to handling RuntimeWarning this way, though:

>>> import numpy
>>> numpy.seterr(all='raise')
{'over': 'warn', 'divide': 'warn', 'invalid': 'warn', 'under': 'ignore'}
>>> try:
...     numpy.log(0.)
... except FloatingPointError:
...     print "caught"
... 
caught

Either way, it works, though Python really should throw some kind of exception for passing a string instead of a class to warnings.simplefilter.

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1  
Sorry, my fault... just edit your answer, but it has to be warnings.simplefilter("error", RuntimeWarning) of course. If anything python could complain earlier before the actual event... –  seberg Jan 2 '13 at 23:40
    
warnings.simplefilter may not raise an exception because strings are valid exceptions at least until Python 2.6. Maybe you are using an older version, or the warnings module didn't get the memo. –  Phil Frost Jan 3 '13 at 2:17
    
@PhilFrost, this is Python 2.7.3, so I guess it has to be warnings. –  nosuchthingasstars Jan 3 '13 at 2:22

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