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Just wondering if there are any typical issues when using this form of database command/connection. Is there something "better"? Anything else that could possibly help me improve my TSQL/C# skills would be much appreciated! Thank you!

private void Approval_Status(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        Button Approval = (Button)sender;
        /*
         * Boolean determining if the request was approved or denied
         */
        Boolean Status = false;

        if (ValidateApproval(Approval.Text.Trim().ToUpper()) == true)
        {
            SqlCommand cmd0 = new SqlCommand();
            cmd0.Connection = db.con(user.Authority);
            cmd0.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
            cmd0.CommandText = "UPDATE [TBL_REQUEST] " +
                "SET [TBL_REQUEST].[REQUEST_STATUS]=@Status, [TBL_REQUEST].[APPROVED_BY]=@Approver, " +
                "[TBL_REQUEST].[DATE_APPROVED]=@Date, [TBL_REQUEST].[PRINTED_NAME]=@Name, " +
                "[TBL_REQUEST].[TITLE]=@Title, [TBL_REQUEST].[PTO_USED]=@Used " +
                "WHERE [TBL_REQUEST].[ID]=@ID; ";
            if (Approval.Text.ToUpper() == codes.RequestApproved)
            {
                cmd0.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Status", SqlDbType.VarChar).Value = codes.RequestApproved;
                Status = true ;
            }
            else
            {
                cmd0.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Status", SqlDbType.VarChar).Value = codes.RequestDenied;
                Status = false;
            }
            cmd0.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Approver", SqlDbType.VarChar).Value = user.User;
            cmd0.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Date", SqlDbType.Date).Value = DateTime.Today.ToShortDateString();
            cmd0.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Name", SqlDbType.VarChar).Value = txtApproval.Text.Trim();
            cmd0.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Title", SqlDbType.VarChar).Value = user.Title;
            cmd0.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Used", SqlDbType.Float).Value = (float)nudUsed.Value;
            cmd0.Parameters.AddWithValue("@ID", SqlDbType.VarChar).Value = txtID.Text.Trim();
            /*
             * Execute our non-query
             */
            db.conEstablished.Open();
            cmd0.ExecuteNonQuery();
            db.conEstablished.Close();
            /*
             * Dispose our resources
             */
            cmd0.Dispose();
            ClearRequestsPanel();
            /*
             * Inform our user of a successful update
             */
            if (Status == true)
            {
                MessageBox.Show(msg.RequestApproved);
            }
            else if (Status == false)
            {
                MessageBox.Show(msg.RequestDenied);
            }
        }
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closed as not constructive by JohnFx, ean5533, marc_s, Jon B, Linger Jan 3 '13 at 18:29

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
What is db.con? And the using statement is part of the language - it's not a function. –  Jon Skeet Jan 2 '13 at 20:15
2  
You should use using. –  SLaks Jan 2 '13 at 20:15
    
The typical issue when using this form is forgetting the cmd0.Dispose() call, which using takes care of. :) –  prprcupofcoffee Jan 2 '13 at 20:15
1  
@David: Not just forgetting it, but failing to put it in a finally block... –  Jon Skeet Jan 2 '13 at 20:20
1  
Please remember that x == true => x. You don't need to compare boolean expression to true. –  Ilia G Jan 2 '13 at 20:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your code should look something like this. Obviously I've got variables here that are defined elsewhere but hopefully this gives you a better idea of how to use using

using(var dbconn = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
{
    using (var dbcmd = new SqlCommand(storedProcedure, dbconn))
    {
        dbcmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
        dbcmd.Parameters.AddRange(sqlParameters.ToArray());
        dbconn.Open();
        return dbcmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
    }
}
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Thank you for actually answering the question. I was looking for the proper syntax for 'using'. –  Joshua Volearix Jan 3 '13 at 14:39

It looks like you may well be trying to create your own connection pooling. Don't do that:

  • Use using statements for all disposable resources. That includes SqlConnection and SqlCommand. That way, even if an exception is thrown, the resource is disposed
  • Create a new SqlConnection for each database operation, and let the system manage pooling the real network connections.

It's not clear what db.con(...) and db.conEstablished are, but it sounds like you've quite possibly got a single connection - which means that you can't use this code safely in a multi-threaded environment. It's fine to have a helper method to create a SqlConnection, but it should just create a new one each time, which is then disposed when the operation has been completed.

Additionally, you should start following .NET naming conventions, and this code:

if (Status == true)
{
    MessageBox.Show(msg.RequestApproved);
}
else if (Status == false)
{
    MessageBox.Show(msg.RequestDenied);
}

... would be better written as:

MessageBox.Show(Status ? msg.RequestApproved : msg.RequestDenied);
share|improve this answer
    
MessageBox.Show(Status ? msg.RequestApproved : msg.RequestDenied); ...Was helpful! Learned something new, thanks! –  Joshua Volearix Jan 2 '13 at 20:26
    
@JoshuaVolearix: Even if you wanted to use the if version, it would be better to use if (Status) { ... } else { ... }. For one thing, if it's not true it will definitely be false - and it's generally cleaner style IMO to use if (foo) or if (!foo) rather than if (foo == true) or if (foo == false). –  Jon Skeet Jan 2 '13 at 20:37
    
Definitely good to know, I've only been programming C# for two weeks now and everything else past the ABSOLUTE basics has been self taught in general. Things like that don't really get covered in beginner books! –  Joshua Volearix Jan 2 '13 at 20:48

using is the "proper" way to handle disposable objects like the SqlConnection.

Part of the problem with your code is that if the query causes an exception, then this line will be skipped, because the exception will break out of the method:

cmd0.Dispose();

When using using the dispose will always be called, even if an exception exits the block (internally it just wraps the code in a try/catch and puts the call to .Dispose() in the catch block.)

Also you should note that the SqlConnection class handles pooling internally. It is not actually a single open network connection to the DB.

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