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I'm in a bit of a pickle. I know that calling [self methodName] from within a block will lead to a retain cycle.

However in this class due to multithreading I cannot allow execution of the method that the block is accessing from anywhere else other than the block, as it would potentially lead to serious problems.

Current code:

 if (_getRunning==NO){
        __weak SyncArrayMT *_weak_self = self;
        _get_t = ^void (void){
            _weak_self->_getRunning = YES;
            NSArray *objects = [_weak_self get:getQuery 
                                usingClassCtor:ctor 
                                 withAuthBlock:authBlock];
            if (_weak_self.getBlockCb)
                _weak_self.getBlockCb(objects);
            _weak_self->_getRunning = NO;
        };
    }

Does exactly that, it calls [self getmethod]. While its ok for the dispatched block to run this method, I do not want anything outside this class calling this method. So, would it be ok to override this inherited method as such:

- (NSArray *) get:(NSString *)getQuery usingClassCtor:(initBlock)initCb withAuthBlock:(authenticate)authBlock
{
    NSLog(@"Direct call to get is not allowed - use the threaded method");
    return nil;
}

And then change the block to this:

        _get_t = ^void (void){
            _weak_self->_getRunning = YES;
            NSArray *objects = [super get:getQuery 
                                usingClassCtor:ctor 
                                 withAuthBlock:authBlock];
            if (_weak_self.getBlockCb)
                _weak_self.getBlockCb(objects);
            _weak_self->_getRunning = NO;
        };

I have tried it and it works without doing a call to the [self getMethod], but will super be retained, properly released, etc? Yes I am using ARC. Would calling super within a block lead to any problem ? Is there a hack to get a __weak to super instead ?

Alternatively, how can I disallow direct calls to [self getMethod] (which is inherited) and only use it internally ? I know that Objective-C doesn't exactly implement this, but I know there are tricks, such as declaring and implementing a method in the implementation file only.

EDIT#1:

I have tried with SEL & IMP and function pointers. Problem is that IMP and function pointers require as a parameter an instance, and this renders the hole point mute:

NSString * (*getFuncPtr)(id,SEL,id,id) = (NSString * (*)(id,SEL,id,id))[super methodForSelector:@selector(sendObjectsPassingTest:withAuthBlock:)];
NSString *reply = getFuncPtr(_weak_self,@selector(sendObjectsPassingTest:withAuthBlock:),predicate,authBlock);

This simply calls the inherited method. Trying to use it with super simply gives an error. At this point I will go ahead and simply use super within the block, and try and profile to see if it leads to any retain cycle.

EDIT#2:

Based on newacct's answer, this is what I ended up doing:

typedef NSArray * (* getFuncPtr)(id,SEL,id,id,id);
...
...
__weak SyncArrayMT *_weak_self = self;
_getMethod = (NSArray * (*)(id,SEL,id,id,id))[[[self class] superclass] instanceMethodForSelector:@selector(get:usingClassCtor:withAuthBlock:)];
_get_t = ^void (void){
   NSArray *objects = _weak_self->_getMethod(_weak_self,@selector(get:usingClassCtor:withAuthBlock:),getQuery,ctor,authBlock);
}

I am hoping this should avoid any retain cycles, although I haven't actually profiled it yet.

share|improve this question
    
Why can't you just declare a weakSelf pointer to the superclass? You know, like __weak __block NSObject *weakSuper = self;? –  CodaFi Jan 2 '13 at 21:31
    
Thats an interesting idea, let me test that. –  Alex Jan 2 '13 at 21:38
    
No it doesn't work, for some reason the inherited method gets called and not the one from the superclass. It seems that only [super method] delegates the call to the right class. Unless I am doing it wrong. –  Alex Jan 2 '13 at 21:42
    
There was a typo in CodaFi's comment, should have been: __weak __block NSObject *weakSuper = super; –  Andrew Tetlaw Jan 3 '13 at 0:54
2  
@AndrewTetlaw: No, super is not a valid expression in Objective-C (as with most other OO languages, e.g. Java). It can only be used on the left side of a message call expression. –  newacct Jan 3 '13 at 3:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I know that calling [self methodName] from within a block will lead to a retain cycle.

That is not true in general. The block will retain self, yes. But there will only be a "retain cycle" if self somehow retains the block. In this case, it does.

but will super be retained

Yes, self will be retained (super is a call on self with a different method lookup pathway).

I have tried with SEL & IMP and function pointers. Problem is that IMP and function pointers require as a parameter an instance, and this renders the hole point mute:

NSString * (*getFuncPtr)(id,SEL,id,id) = (NSString * (*)(id,SEL,id,id))[super methodForSelector:@selector(sendObjectsPassingTest:withAuthBlock:)]; 
NSString *reply = getFuncPtr(_weak_self,@selector(sendObjectsPassingTest:withAuthBlock:),predicate,authBlock); 

This simply calls the inherited method. Trying to use it with super simply gives an error. At this point I will go ahead and simply use super within the block, and try and profile to see if it leads to any retain cycle.

There are many wrong points here. First, as said above, super is a call on self (there is no such thing as a super object), so it would be sufficient to get the IMP for the method in the superclass, and call it on self.

BUT, [super methodForSelector:... does not get the method in the superclass. It actually gets the method in this class. The super in [super methodForSelector:... affects which methodForSelector: method is called. However, no class ever overrides methodForSelector:, so there is actually no difference between [super methodForSelector:... and [self methodForSelector:.... As said above, super calls the method on self, so it still finds the method based on the class of the current object.

You can get the right IMP by using the class method +instanceMethodForSelector::

NSString *(*getFuncPtr)(id,SEL,id,id) = (NSString * (*)(id,SEL,id,id))[[[self class] superclass] instanceMethodForSelector:@selector(sendObjectsPassingTest:withAuthBlock:)];

However, using the above will not work correctly if the current object is an instance of a subclass, because then [self class] will be the subclass. So to make sure it does what we want, we need to hard-code the name of our current class, or the superclass:

NSString *(*getFuncPtr)(id,SEL,id,id) = (NSString * (*)(id,SEL,id,id))[[SyncArrayMT superclass] instanceMethodForSelector:@selector(sendObjectsPassingTest:withAuthBlock:)];
NSString *reply = getFuncPtr(_weak_self,@selector(sendObjectsPassingTest:withAuthBlock:),predicate,authBlock);

It is also possible to do it using objc_msgSendSuper directly, but that function is not really that easy to use either. So I think you should stick with the IMP approach above.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much, this makes much more sense. I ended up doing something based on your approach. Bear in mind Instruments did not show any retain issues when using [super] but I could be wrong. –  Alex Jan 3 '13 at 15:05

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