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Good day to ya'll. I had this programming excericise of mine where I had to find the shortest path to an exit in an NxM -grid maze in under a second (both N and M would be anywhere between 3 and 1000). The program would be tested with 10 different inputs (mazes), all of which includes a very different amount of exits.

The input goes as follows:

7 10
##########
#.....#... <- exit
#.#.###.##
#..X..#..#
#.#.#.#.##
#......... <- exit
###.######
   ^exit

Where the first number is height and the second width. The rest is the maze itself, and X marks the (starting) spot.

Well, I solved the problem using the A* algorithm and at the same time keeping track of the nearest exit (simple manhattan distance). Now what's bugging me is that my fellow programmers have come to a lot faster and more memory-friendly solutions than I. My request is that you guys point out anything that comes to your mind, were it to be a completely different algorithm or just a stupid memory leak.

Here's the code:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>

typedef std::vector<int> monovector;
typedef std::vector< std::vector<int> > bivector;

int _abs(int num);
int* get_nearest_goal(int y, int x, bivector &goals_t);
int goals = 0;

void appendClosedList(int y, int x, bivector &openList, bivector &closedList) {
    for(size_t i = 0; i < openList.size(); i++)
        if(openList[i][0] == y && openList[i][1] == x) closedList.push_back(openList[i]);
}

void dropOpenList(int y, int x, bivector &openList) {
    for(size_t i = 0; i < openList.size(); i++)
        if(openList[i][0] == y && openList[i][1] == x) openList.erase(openList.begin()+i);
}

int* get_coords(bivector &openList)
{
    int* coords = new int[2];
    int min_element = 1000000;
    for(size_t i = 0; i < openList.size(); i++) {
        if(openList[i][2] < min_element) {
            min_element = openList[i][2];
            coords[0] = openList[i][0];
            coords[1] = openList[i][1];
        }
    }
    return coords;
}

struct laby_t {
    int h, w, s_y, s_x;
    char **m_layout;
    int ***m_attr, ***_m_attr;
    int ***m_parent, ***_m_parent;

    laby_t() {
        std::cin >> h >> w;

        m_layout  = new char *[h+1];
        for (int i = 0; i < h+1; i++)
            m_layout[i]  = new char[w+1];

        m_parent = new int **[h];
        m_attr  = new int **[h];
        for (int i = 0; i < h; i++) {
            m_attr[i]  = new int *[w];
            m_parent[i] = new int *[w];

            std::cin >> m_layout[i];

            for (int j = 0; j < w; j++) {
                m_attr[i][j] = new int[4];
                m_parent[i][j] = new int[2];

                m_attr[i][j][0] = 0;
                m_attr[i][j][1] = 0;
                m_parent[i][j][0] = 0;
                m_parent[i][j][1] = 0;
                if(m_layout[i][j] == '#') m_attr[i][j][0] = 2;
                if(m_layout[i][j] == 'X') { s_y = i; s_x = j; }
            }
        }

    }

    int get_visited (int y, int x) { return this->m_attr[y][x][0]; }
    int get_depth(int y, int x)    {
        if(this->m_attr[y][x][1]) return this->m_attr[y][x][1];
        else return 0;
    }
    int get_estimate(int y, int x) { return this->m_attr[y][x][2]; }
    int get_priority(int y, int x) { return this->m_attr[y][x][3]; }

    void set_visited(int py, int px, int y, int x, int f_y, int f_x, int depth)  {
        this->m_attr[y][x][0] = 1; 
        this->m_attr[y][x][1] = depth;
        this->m_attr[y][x][2] = _abs(f_y - y) + _abs(f_x - x);
        this->m_attr[y][x][3] = this->m_attr[y][x][1] + this->m_attr[y][x][2];
        this->m_parent[y][x][0] = py;
        this->m_parent[y][x][1] = px;
    }

    void reset()
    {
        delete this->m_attr;
        delete this->m_parent;
        delete this->m_layout;
    }
};

void dropGoals(int f_y, int f_x, bivector &goals_t, laby_t &laby)
{
    for(size_t i = 0; i < goals_t.size(); i++)
        if(goals_t[i][0] == f_y && goals_t[i][1] == f_x) {
            goals_t.erase(goals_t.begin()+i);
            laby.m_layout[goals_t[i][0]][goals_t[i][i]] = '#';
            laby.m_attr[goals_t[i][0]][goals_t[i][i]][0] = 2;
        }
}

int wander(int y, int x, int f_y, int f_x, laby_t &laby, bivector goals_t)
{
    int depth = 1;
    laby.set_visited(y, x, y, x, f_y, f_x, depth);
    monovector r; r.push_back(y); r.push_back(x); r.push_back(laby.get_priority(y, x)); r.push_back(0);
    bivector openList, closedList;
    openList.push_back(r);
    r.clear();

    int dir[4][2] = {
                        { 1, 0},
                        {-1, 0},
                        { 0, 1},
                        { 0,-1}
                    };

    while(!(y == f_y && x == f_x))
    {
        for(int i = 0; i < 4; i++)
        {
            int _y = y + dir[i][0];
            int _x = x + dir[i][1];
            if(y > 0 && y < laby.h-1 && x > 0 && x < laby.w-1) {
                if(
                    (
                        (laby.get_visited(_y, _x) == 0) ||
                        (laby.get_visited(_y, _x) == 1 && laby.get_depth(y, x)+1 < laby.get_depth(_y, _x))
                    )
                  )
                {
                    laby.set_visited(y, x, _y, _x, f_y, f_x, laby.get_depth(y, x)+1);
                    monovector r; r.push_back(_y); r.push_back(_x); r.push_back(laby.get_priority(_y, _x));
                    openList.push_back(r);
                    r.clear();

                    if((_y == 0 || _y == laby.h-1 || _x == 0 || _x == laby.w-1) && (_y != f_y || _x != f_x)) {
                        int d = laby.get_depth(_y, _x);
                        openList.clear();
                        closedList.clear();
                        laby.reset();
                        return d;
                    }
                }
            }
            else { return laby.get_depth(y, x); };
        }

        appendClosedList(y, x, openList, closedList);
        dropOpenList(y, x, openList);

        int *yx = get_coords(openList);
        y = yx[0];
        x = yx[1];

        yx = get_nearest_goal(y, x, goals_t);
        f_y = yx[0];
        f_x = yx[1];

        delete yx;

    }
    int d = laby.get_depth(y, x);
    openList.clear();
    closedList.clear();
    laby.reset();
    return d;
}

int _abs(int num)
{
    if(num <= 0) return -num;
    else return num;
}

int* get_nearest_goal(int y, int x, bivector &goals_t)
{
    int min_dist = 1000000;
    int *f_coords = new int[2];
    for(size_t i = 1; i < goals_t.size(); i++) {
        if(_abs(y - goals_t[i][0]) + _abs(x - goals_t[i][1]) < min_dist) {
            min_dist = _abs(y - goals_t[i][0]) + _abs(x - goals_t[i][1]);
            f_coords[0] = goals_t[i][0];
            f_coords[1] = goals_t[i][1];
        }
    }

    return f_coords;
}

int* get_goals(int &goals, bivector &goals_t, laby_t &laby)
{
    for(int i = 1; i < laby.h - 1; i++) {
        if(laby.m_layout[i][0] == '.') {
            goals++;
            monovector t; t.push_back(i); t.push_back(0); goals_t.push_back(t);
            t.clear();
        }
        if(laby.m_layout[i][laby.w - 1] == '.') {
            goals++;
            monovector t; t.push_back(i); t.push_back(laby.w - 1); goals_t.push_back(t);
            t.clear();
        }
    }

    for(int i = 1; i < laby.w - 1; i++) {
        if(laby.m_layout[0][i] == '.') {
            goals++;
            monovector t; t.push_back(0); t.push_back(i); goals_t.push_back(t);
            t.clear();
        }
        if(laby.m_layout[laby.h - 1][i] == '.') {
            goals++;
            monovector t; t.push_back(laby.h - 1); t.push_back(i); goals_t.push_back(t);
            t.clear();
        }
    }

    return get_nearest_goal(laby.s_y, laby.s_x, goals_t);
}

int main()
{
    int *f_coords = new int[2];
    bivector goals_t;
    laby_t laby;

    f_coords = get_goals(goals, goals_t, laby);

    int min_path = wander(laby.s_y, laby.s_x, f_coords[0], f_coords[1], laby, goals_t);

    delete f_coords;

    std::cout << min_path << std::endl;
    //system("pause");
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question

closed as off topic by templatetypedef, Shmiddty, BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft, Vlad Lazarenko, Fraser Jan 2 '13 at 22:52

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1  
This looks like a better fit for the Code Review site. –  templatetypedef Jan 2 '13 at 21:40
    
Ah. Sorry about that. I'll do that –  Olavi Mustanoja Jan 2 '13 at 21:42
1  
Also, I doubt people will be willing to help you much if you say you are too lazy to add comments ;) –  Kevin Jan 2 '13 at 22:10

1 Answer 1

I didn't look in detail at your algorithm, but it is possible that the closest exit with the Manhattan distance is not the best possible. This could cause your heuristic to be too under estimate the distance too much, and A* degenerating to a depth first search in your graph.

For example, in that graph, it is better to use the exit on the right as heuristic than the exit on the left. A* algorithm will give the correct answer in both case, but will try to go left, before trying to go right. This is suboptimal.

  #######################################################################
  #......................X.........................................#..... <
  ################################################################...####
> ......................................................................#
  #######################################################################

I would instead suggest either using another algorithm like Dijkstra (that compute the distance to all points from a given starting point). Another option is to reverse the search. The A* algorithm support having multiple starting points (just initialise the open set with all of them), so just do a search from the exit to the starting point. Since your graph is not oriented, you'll just have to reverse the returned path to get the solution.

share|improve this answer
    
Why would this possibly cause the heuristic to be incorrect? "Manhattan distance to nearest exit" certainly seems to be an admissible heuristic to me - where am I going wrong? –  us2012 Jan 2 '13 at 22:31
    
At first the algorithm starts going toward the nearest exit which has been calculated beforehand. As the algorithm steams forward, with every step it takes, it checks if another exit is closer than the previously chosen exit, and makes this new exit the goal. I had to choose between looping the A* through all different goals or make it dynamic by integrating it with NNA (nearest neighbour algorithm). The latter was a go, and it worked. Anyway I came up upon dijkstra aswell while searching for a good algorithm to use here, but to me it seemed like A* with weighed graphs. Correct me if I'm wrong –  Olavi Mustanoja Jan 2 '13 at 23:23
1  
@us2012 You're right, the heuristic will always underestimate the distance to the exit, so it is always admissible. However, in some configuration, the heuristic may be too low, which would cause a degradation of the performance of the algorithm. –  Sylvain Defresne Jan 3 '13 at 9:39

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