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Ok, so I have VERY weird problem with my courier installation.. When I try to log in, I need username and password right? Except that I can as password use any string, which has prefix same like my password. Example:

let say that this is my password:

#password#

I can successfully log in with ANY of the following passwords:

#password#
#password#FOO
#password#BAR

etc..

I am using mysql for storing user data, this is my /etc/courier/authmysqlrc

MYSQL_SERVER localhost
MYSQL_USERNAME #USER
MYSQL_PASSWORD #PASSWORD
MYSQL_PORT 0
MYSQL_DATABASE mail
MYSQL_USER_TABLE users
MYSQL_CRYPT_PWFIELD password
#MYSQL_CLEAR_PWFIELD password
MYSQL_UID_FIELD 5000
MYSQL_GID_FIELD 5000
MYSQL_LOGIN_FIELD email
MYSQL_HOME_FIELD "/home/vmail"
MYSQL_MAILDIR_FIELD CONCAT(SUBSTRING_INDEX(email,'@',-1),'/',SUBSTRING_INDEX(email,'@',1),'/')
#MYSQL_NAME_FIELD
MYSQL_QUOTA_FIELD quota

Where could be a problem? Thanks in advance for your help

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up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

The problem is that the passwords are crypted by using the operating system's crypt() function, which looks only at the first 8 characters of the password to generate the encrypted hash.
As explained here:

If you have a password longer than 8 characters, as long as the first 8 characters match, crypt() will call it a valid match. For example, if your password is “password” and is stored as a crypted hash in a htpasswd file, checking against “passwordX” will be exactly the same as checking against “password”, “password123″, and so on; that is, it will be returned as a valid check because the first 8 characters match properly. Similarly, if your password is “longpassword” and you check against only “longpass”, that will be returned as valid, too.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, did not know about that.. little scary :/ is there anything I can do about it? Like tell authdaemon to switch to another hashing function? – Paladin Jan 19 '13 at 9:30
    
@Paladin Maybe you could try to use CRAM-MD5 authentication, since authmysqlrc supports it, as you can read here. You can find further informations about CRAM-MD5 authentication here – user1419445 Jan 19 '13 at 9:41
    
Yeah, I considered CRAM-MD5, but "CRAM-MD5 authentication is also be supported by authldap, authpgsql and authmysql, as long as clear-text passwords are used.".. I don't like clear text passwords.. – Paladin Jan 19 '13 at 18:19

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