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This is a simpler example of the real data, which is an NxN matrix of N>100. Now what I want to find is the top 3 for each row, then find which columns are most often in the top 3 and under what rows does it occur.

        A   B   C   D   E   F   G
    A   0   70  5   73  96  46  58
    B   47  0   20  89  75  50  19
    C   42  98  0   30  30  22  76
    D   66  20  18  0   63  18  60
    E   73  0   63  51  0   23  7
    F   79  34  61  56  12  0   99
    G   25  26  41  86  51  30  0

Now, I've tried to find the same result by creating a binary matrix where if a cell is in the top 3 of a row then it is a 1, otherwise 0; however, I'm having the most difficulty creating a table that is not rectangular.

        A   B   C   D   E   F   G
    A   0   1   0   1   1   0   0
    B   0   0   0   1   1   1   0
    C   1   1   0   0   0   0   1
    D   1   0   0   0   1   0   1
    E   1   0   1   1   0   0   0
    F   1   0   1   0   0   0   1
    G   0   0   1   1   1   0   0

The final product should look something like the following, where A is in the top three under conditions C, D, E, and F.

    A       D       E       C       G       B       F
    C (42)  A (73)  A (96)  E (63)  C (76)  A (70)  B (50)
    D (66)  B (89)  B (75)  F (61)  D (60)  C (98)  
    E (73)  E (51)  D (63)  G (41)  F (99)      
    F (79)  G (86)  G (51)      

Any advice or points in the right direction would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!

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4 Answers 4

The structure you're showing I find quite confusing to look at. What if instead you substitue the values for their positions in your second matrix:

foo = structure(c(0L, 47L, 42L, 66L, 73L, 79L, 25L, 70L, 0L, 98L, 20L, 
0L, 34L, 26L, 5L, 20L, 0L, 18L, 63L, 61L, 41L, 73L, 89L, 30L, 
0L, 51L, 56L, 86L, 96L, 75L, 30L, 63L, 0L, 12L, 51L, 46L, 50L, 
22L, 18L, 23L, 0L, 30L, 58L, 19L, 76L, 60L, 7L, 99L, 0L), .Dim = c(7L, 
7L), .Dimnames = list(c("A", "B", "C", "D", "E", "F", "G"), c("A", 
"B", "C", "D", "E", "F", "G")))

bar = structure(c(0L, 0L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 0L, 1L, 0L, 1L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 
0L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 0L, 0L, 1L, 0L, 1L, 1L, 
1L, 0L, 1L, 0L, 0L, 1L, 0L, 1L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 1L, 
1L, 0L, 1L, 0L), .Dim = c(7L, 7L), .Dimnames = list(c("A", "B", 
"C", "D", "E", "F", "G"), c("A", "B", "C", "D", "E", "F", "G"
)))

bar[as.logical(bar)] = foo[as.logical(bar)]

> bar
   A  B  C  D  E  F  G
A  0 70  0 73 96  0  0
B  0  0  0 89 75 50  0
C 42 98  0  0  0  0 76
D 66  0  0  0 63  0 60
E 73  0 63 51  0  0  0
F 79  0 61  0  0  0 99
G  0  0 41 86 51  0  0

The structure you're showing could be created as a list, but I don't think it makes for clear data display. However, feel free to expand or clarify your output needs.

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Here is how I did it:

X <- read.table(stdin())
A   B   C   D   E   F   G
A   0   70  5   73  96  46  58
B   47  0   20  89  75  50  19
C   42  98  0   30  30  22  76
D   66  20  18  0   63  18  60
E   73  0   63  51  0   23  7
F   79  34  61  56  12  0   99
G   25  26  41  86  51  30  0



indices <- which(t(apply(X,1,function(x) x >= sort(x,decr=TRUE)[3])), arr.ind=TRUE)
values  <- X[indices]

letters <- matrix(rownames(X)[indices],ncol=2)


data.frame(letters, values)

First, we read in the data as a table. Then we test each element against the third largest in each row. The rest just makes the output a bit nicer:

   X1 X2 values
1   C  A     42
2   D  A     66
3   E  A     73
4   F  A     79
5   A  B     70
6   C  B     98
7   E  C     63
8   F  C     61
9   G  C     41
10  A  D     73
11  B  D     89
12  E  D     51
13  G  D     86
14  A  E     96
15  B  E     75
16  D  E     63
17  G  E     51
18  B  F     50
19  C  G     76
20  D  G     60
21  F  G     99
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Awesome, now I would want to sort this result so the letters that occur most often in X2 occur first. @Neal –  Lcat91 Jan 4 '13 at 19:17
dat <- structure(c(0L, 47L, 42L, 66L, 73L, 79L, 25L, 70L, 0L, 98L, 20L, 
0L, 34L, 26L, 5L, 20L, 0L, 18L, 63L, 61L, 41L, 73L, 89L, 30L, 
0L, 51L, 56L, 86L, 96L, 75L, 30L, 63L, 0L, 12L, 51L, 46L, 50L, 
22L, 18L, 23L, 0L, 30L, 58L, 19L, 76L, 60L, 7L, 99L, 0L), .Dim = c(7L, 
7L), .Dimnames = list(c("A", "B", "C", "D", "E", "F", "G"), c("A", 
"B", "C", "D", "E", "F", "G")))

Your intermediate matrix can be be computed by doing:

in.top3 <- t(apply(-foo, 1, rank)) <= 3

Then you can create a list of top3 rows for each column by doing;

apply(in.top3, 2, function(x)names(which(x)))
# $A
# [1] "C" "D" "E" "F"
# 
# $B
# [1] "A" "C"
# 
# $C
# [1] "E" "F" "G"
# 
# $D
# [1] "A" "B" "E" "G"
# 
# $E
# [1] "A" "B" "D" "G"
# 
# $F
# [1] "B"
# 
# $G
# [1] "C" "D" "F"
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inter <- 0 + t( apply(foo, 1, rank) >= 5)  # don't actually need it but shows how.

vals <- foo * ( 0+t(apply(foo, 1, rank)>=5))
#----------
   A  B  C  D  E  F  G
A  0 70  0 73 96  0  0
B  0  0  0 89 75 50  0
C 42 98  0  0  0  0 76
D 66  0  0  0 63  0 60
E 73  0 63 51  0  0  0
F 79  0 61  0  0  0 99
G  0  0 41 86 51  0  0

vals [ , rev( order( colSums(vals >0) )) ]  
 # Arrange in order of increasing numbers of top three
#-------
   E  D  A  G  C  B  F
A 96 73  0  0  0 70  0
B 75 89  0  0  0  0 50
C  0  0 42 76  0 98  0
D 63  0 66 60  0  0  0
E  0 51 73  0 63  0  0
F  0  0 79 99 61  0  0
G 51 86  0  0 41  0  0

If you wanted the A col to be first, you could use: vals [ , order( -colSums(vals >0) ) ]. And if you could settle for a horizontal display:

> apply( vals2 , 2, function(col) paste0(rownames(foo)[col>0], " (", col[col>0], ")" ) )
$A
[1] "C (42)" "D (66)" "E (73)" "F (79)"

$D
[1] "A (73)" "B (89)" "E (51)" "G (86)"

$E
[1] "A (96)" "B (75)" "D (63)" "G (51)"

$C
[1] "E (63)" "F (61)" "G (41)"

$G
[1] "C (76)" "D (60)" "F (99)"

$B
[1] "A (70)" "C (98)"

$F
[1] "B (50)"
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