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This problem is teasing me:

I have 6 different sequences that each overlap, they are name 1-6. I have made a function that represents the sequences in a dictionary, and a function that gives me the part of the sequences that overlap.

Now i should use those 2 functions to construct a dictionary that take the number of overlapping positions in both the right-to-left order and in the left-to-right oder.

The dictionary I have made look like:

{'1': 'GGCTCCCCACGGGGTACCCATAACTTGACAGTAGATCTCGTCCAGACCCCTAGC',
 '2': 'CTTTACCCGGAAGAGCGGGACGCTGCCCTGCGCGATTCCAGGCTCCCCACGGG',
 '3': 'GTCTTCAGTAGAAAATTGTTTTTTTCTTCCAAGAGGTCGGAGTCGTGAACACATCAGT',
 '4': 'TGCGAGGGAAGTGAAGTATTTGACCCTTTACCCGGAAGAGCG',
 '5': 'CGATTCCAGGCTCCCCACGGGGTACCCATAACTTGACAGTAGATCTC',
 '6': 'TGACAGTAGATCTCGTCCAGACCCCTAGCTGGTACGTCTTCAGTAGAAAATTGTTTTTTTCTTCCAAGAGGTCGGAGT'}

I should end up with a result like:

{'1': {'3': 0, '2': 1, '5': 1, '4': 0, '6': 29},
'3': {'1': 0, '2': 0, '5': 0, '4': 1, '6': 1},
'2': {'1': 13, '3': 1, '5': 21, '4': 0, '6': 0},
'5': {'1': 39, '3': 0, '2': 1, '4': 0, '6': 14},
'4': {'1': 1, '3': 1, '2': 17, '5': 2, '6': 0},
'6': {'1': 0, '3': 43, '2': 0, '5': 0, '4': 1}}

I seems impossible. I guess it's not, so if somebody could (not do it) but push me in the right direction, it would be great.

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1  
Have you tried anything so far? –  Lattyware Jan 2 '13 at 22:17
1  
Please show us the functions you've written. –  James Thiele Jan 2 '13 at 22:24
1  
I don't think this should affect the answer to your question, but just in case, what exactly do you mean by "the part of the sequences that overlap"? How can you represent this as a single integer? –  Kyle Strand Jan 2 '13 at 22:31
    
Ah, DNA / RNA sequences right? :) –  arshajii Jan 2 '13 at 22:34

2 Answers 2

This is a bit of a complicated one-liner, but it should work. Using find_overlaps() as the function that finds overlaps and seq_dict as the original dictionary of sequences:

overlaps = {seq:{other_seq:find_overlaps(seq_dict[seq],seq_dict[other_seq])
    for other_seq in seq_dict if other_seq != seq} for seq in seq_dict}

Here it is with a bit nicer spacing:

overlaps = \
{seq:
    {other_seq:
        find_overlaps(seq_dict[seq],seq_dict[other_seq])
    for other_seq in seq_dict if other_seq != seq}
for seq in seq_dict}
share|improve this answer
    
I can't actually test this without having your find_overlaps() function and knowing what exactly it's supposed to do, but it seems to behave as expected using a dummy "return 1" function. –  Kyle Strand Jan 2 '13 at 22:33
    
+1 for the comprehension. Very concise. –  jpm Jan 2 '13 at 22:49
    
Thanks. I think dictionary comprehensions might be a Python 2.7 feature, though, so perhaps this should be used with caution. –  Kyle Strand Jan 2 '13 at 22:50
    
Yeah, but at this point, probably the only people still running <2.7 are corporations with business critical applications that can't afford the down time for a system update. –  jpm Jan 2 '13 at 22:53
    
Hence my initial throw-caution-to-the-wind endorsement of dictionary comprehensions! :D –  Kyle Strand Jan 2 '13 at 22:54

The clean way:

dna = {
    '1': 'GGCTCCCCACGGGGTACCCATAACTTGACAGTAGATCTCGTCCAGACCCCTAGC',
    '2': 'CTTTACCCGGAAGAGCGGGACGCTGCCCTGCGCGATTCCAGGCTCCCCACGGG',
    '3': 'GTCTTCAGTAGAAAATTGTTTTTTTCTTCCAAGAGGTCGGAGTCGTGAACACATCAGT',
    '4': 'TGCGAGGGAAGTGAAGTATTTGACCCTTTACCCGGAAGAGCG',
    '5': 'CGATTCCAGGCTCCCCACGGGGTACCCATAACTTGACAGTAGATCTC',
    '6': 'TGACAGTAGATCTCGTCCAGACCCCTAGCTGGTACGTCTTCAGTAGAAAATTG' \
         'TTTTTTTCTTCCAAGAGGTCGGAGT'
}

def overlap(a, b):
    l = min(len(a), len(b))
    while True:
        if a[-l:] == b[:l] or l == 0:
            return l
        l -= 1

def all_overlaps(d):
    result = {}
    for k1, v1 in d.items():
        overlaps = {}
        for k2, v2 in d.items():
            if k1 == k2:
                continue
            overlaps[k2] = overlap(v1, v2)
        result[k1] = overlaps
    return result

print all_overlaps(dna)

(By the way, you could've provided overlap yourself in the question to make it easier for everyone to answer.)

share|improve this answer
    
This is roughly how I solved it. I like the readability of this approach. The overlap function only finds the shortest possible match, when I'd bet the longest possible is the info of interest. However, since that's not the actual question, I'll still give you +1. –  jpm Jan 2 '13 at 22:48
    
It does find the largest possible match: l is first set to the largest possible result (min(len(a), len(b))), and the loop counts down from there, returning l as soon as we find a match. –  nooodl Jan 3 '13 at 2:42
    
I stand corrected. –  jpm Jan 3 '13 at 17:15

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