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Why might this code

    long s, e, sum1 = 0, sum2 = 0, TRIALS = 10000000;

    for(long i=0; i<TRIALS; i++) {
        s = System.nanoTime();
        e = System.nanoTime();
        sum1 += e - s;            
        s = System.nanoTime();
        e = System.nanoTime();
        sum2 += e - s;
    }        
    System.out.println(sum1 / TRIALS);
    System.out.println(sum2 / TRIALS);

produce this result

-60  
61 

"on my machine?"

EDIT:
Sam I am's answer points to the nanoSecond() documentation which helps, but now, more precisely, why does the result consistently favor the first sum?

"my machine":
JavaSE-1.7, Eclipse
Win 7 x64, AMD Athlon II X4 635

switching the order inside the loop produces reverse results

for(int i=0; i<TRIALS; i++) {            
    s = System.nanoTime();
    e = System.nanoTime();
    sum2 += e - s;            
    s = System.nanoTime();
    e = System.nanoTime();
    sum1 += e - s;
}  
61
-61  

looking (e-s) before adding it to sum1 makes sum1 positive.

for(long i=0; i<TRIALS; i++) {
    s = System.nanoTime();
    e = System.nanoTime();
    temp = e-s;
    if(temp < 0)
        count++;
    sum1 += temp;

    s = System.nanoTime();
    e = System.nanoTime();
    sum2 += e - s;
}
61  
61

And as Andrew Alcock points out, sum1 += -s + e produces the expected outcome.

for(long i=0; i<TRIALS; i++) {
    s = System.nanoTime();
    e = System.nanoTime();
    sum1 += -s + e;

    s = System.nanoTime();
    e = System.nanoTime();
    sum2 += -s + e;
}
61
61

A few other tests: http://pastebin.com/QJ93NZxP

share|improve this question
    
What OS / JDK version / CPU? –  parsifal Jan 2 '13 at 22:22
2  
And is the result repeatable? –  parsifal Jan 2 '13 at 22:22
3  
@downvoter - this is a perfectly reasonable question. If you're relying on a timer, you want to have any strange results explained. –  parsifal Jan 2 '13 at 22:27
1  
You shouldn't expect System.nanoTime() to return monotonically increasing results. –  Louis Wasserman Jan 2 '13 at 22:32
    
Could it be caused by execution re-ordering? Do you get the same results if instead of using e, you instead do sum1 += System.nanoTime() - s; –  hatchet Jan 2 '13 at 22:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In conjunction with roundar, we ran a number of tests on this code. In summary, the effect disappeared when:

  1. Running the same code in interpreted mode (-Xint)
  2. Changing the aggregation logic order from sum += e - s to sum += -s + e
  3. Running on some different architectures or different VMs (eg I ran on Java 6 on Mac)
  4. Placing logging statements inspecting s and e
  5. Performing additional arithmetic on s and e

In addition, the effect is not threading:

  1. There are no additional threads spawned
  2. Only local variables are involved
  3. This effect is 100% reproducible in roundar's environment, and always results in precisely the same timings, namely +61 and -61.

The effect is not a timing issue because:

  1. The execution takes place over 10m iterations
  2. This effect is 100% reproducible in roundar's environment
  3. The result is precisely the same timings, namely +61 and -61, on all iterations.

Given the above, I believe we have a bug in the hotspot module of Java VM. The code as written should return positive results, but does not.

share|improve this answer
    
Strange that you'd call it "not a timing issue," when everything that you did changed the number of statements executed. I trust that you've filed a bug with Oracle? –  parsifal Jan 3 '13 at 14:01
    
@parsifal I did, yes. –  roundar Jan 3 '13 at 20:01
    
@parsifal: thanks for catching some bad wording. I was meaning a timing issue on the interaction between threads - basically that class of programs that are non-deterministic due to the precise time that each thread computes each part of each statement. The problem is about timing in the sense that it reads a system clock. Given the single thread and the ordered statements, the program should not produce a negative value and then, after reordering the terms in the arithmetic, a positive one. –  Andrew Alcock Jan 3 '13 at 22:58
    
@andrew - I took a look at the JDK source code last night, and it appears that (at least for Linux), the JVM simply delegates to the OS for all clock-related methods (surprised me, I would have expected nanoTime to not want an OS call involved). There are a lot of comments about the possibility of time running backwards for cases where the OS does not provide monotonic guarantees. So I suspect this is really an OS bug, rather than a JVM bug. –  parsifal Jan 4 '13 at 13:46
    
@parsifal: given 1) that reordering the terms in the expression fixes the issue, or 2) running in interpreted mode fixes the problem, I don't think the OS call is the problem. I think hotspot reorders the statements in the loop in some circumstances. –  Andrew Alcock Jan 4 '13 at 13:52

This answer is supposition. If you update your question with some details about your environment, it's likely that someone else can give a more detailed, grounded answer.

The nanoTime() function works by accessing some high-resolution timer with low access latency. On the x86, I believe this is the Time Stamp Counter, which is driven by the basic clock cycle of the machine.

If you're seeing consistent results of +/- 60 ns, then I believe you're simply seeing the basic interval of the timer on your machine.

However, what about the negative numbers? Again, supposition, but if you read the Wikipedia article, you'll see a comment that Intel processors might re-order the instructions.

share|improve this answer
    
added a bit of info. If there's anything else that might be of interest, let me know, I'll add it. –  roundar Jan 2 '13 at 22:58
    
+1 TSC is different on different cores. The OS should correct for this and give you what appears to be one consistent timer. However, if the thread switches core you can see a small jump which is normally forward in time but is potentially backward in time if the correction is not quite right. –  Peter Lawrey Jan 2 '13 at 23:47

straight from oracle's documentation

In short: the frequency of updating the values can cause results to differ.

nanoTime

public static long nanoTime()

Returns the current value of the most precise available system timer, in nanoseconds.

This method can only be used to measure elapsed time and is not related to any other notion of system or wall-clock time.

The value returned represents nanoseconds since some fixed but arbitrary time (perhaps in the future, so values may be negative). This method provides nanosecond precision, but not necessarily nanosecond accuracy. No guarantees are made about how frequently values change. Differences in successive calls that span greater than approximately 292 years (263 nanoseconds) will not accurately compute elapsed time due to numerical overflow.

For example, to measure how long some code takes to execute:

   long startTime = System.nanoTime();
   // ... the code being measured ...
   long estimatedTime = System.nanoTime() - startTime;


Returns:
    The current value of the system timer, in nanoseconds.
Since:
    1.5
share|improve this answer
2  
You're probably right about update frequency, but not at all about numeric overflow (we can assume the OP didn't spend 292 years to run his/her test). –  parsifal Jan 2 '13 at 22:25
    
Why do the results differ consistently favoring the first over the second? –  roundar Jan 2 '13 at 22:28
    
I just run the test. It took about a few minutes to complete. Possibility of numeric overflow (long, 64-bit) is out of the window. –  nhahtdh Jan 2 '13 at 22:29
    
@roundar That's an interesting detail there, maybe you could try integrating that into your question. –  Sam I am Jan 2 '13 at 22:31
    
@Sam I am edited, thanks. –  roundar Jan 2 '13 at 22:39

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