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class a
{
    public:
        a(int);    
        virtual ~a();
        virtual void print();
        int getNumber()
    private:
        int number;
};

class b : public a
{
    public:
        b(int);
        virtual ~b();
};

class c : public b
{
    public:
        c(int);
        virtual ~c();
        virtual void print();
};

those are headers that represent a cpp file. I implemented all the methods in each appropriate cpp file. I used this code and it works just fine although I wonder if class b should also implemented print (even like that : print(){}), because it seems to me of better programming. so what is the appropriate way to do it ? implement (even if not necessary) or not ?

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thank you for the editing –  John Oldman Jan 3 '13 at 0:40
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You should only write the functions that are going to be overloaded by the subclass. If the subclass is not specializing a given behavior, then it would be bad practice to write a copy of a parent function in the subclass. Not only would this be wasteful and potentially confusing, it could also lead to errors at some point later on.

Consider this: a parent class I'll call Monkey and a subclass I'll call Tarzan. In the Monkey class, I'll define a function for Swing().

Now, since Tarzan is a derivative of Monkey and learned to swing in the trees like Monkey, there's no need to write Tarzan's own version of the Swing function. But, let's say that I did write it anyway just to be "complete." Now I've got 2 routines to update if I need to change the way a Monkey swings: one for the Monkey class and another for Tarzan. Worse yet, if I DO change how a Monkey will Swing and forget to make the same change in Tarzan, Tarzan will no longer swing like a Monkey and THAT would be unexpected and probably wrong.

Conclusion: only write code in subclass functions where the subclass requires specialization from what is already defined for the parent.

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wou are right. thank you !! –  John Oldman Jan 3 '13 at 8:22
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The entire point of inheritance in object-oriented programming is that you can rely on the superclass implementation of methods you don't want to have to rewrite.

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