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Does anyone have any insights as to why Trace calls are not producing output when called inside of a dynamically loaded (using Assembly.CreateInstance) assembly? Strangely, Debug.WriteLine is working just fine inside the assembly and Trace calls from within the assembly that is doing the dynamic loading also work fine. I've confirmed that Trace.Listeners contains the correct listener objects (identical to Debug.Listeners) but calls to Trace just don't produce any output.

This is a huge diagnostic issue for me since my entire application is logging by way of a custom TraceListener.

UPDATE: (From comments below) I'm building the assembly dynamically using CSharpCodeProvider but I was not supplying the /d:TRACE switch in CompilerParameters.CompilerOptions. Consequently TRACE wasn't defined in the assembly and my calls to Trace were essentially being ignored. It's also worth noting that I'm setting CompilerParameters.IncludeDebugInformation = true which may explain why I was getting Debug even though I hadn't explicitly set /d:DEBUG in CompilerParameters.CompilerOptions. This is just a guess - there's nothing in the MSDN docs that states that this is true.

The bottom line here is that when using CSharpCodeProvider to dynamically compile source anything that is assembly-specific is up to you to explicitly define.

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DEBUG and TRACE are 2 different unrelated defines controlling corresponding methods. There is a chance that that assembly compiled with TRACE not defined and as result Trace methods are not doing anything.

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Thanks Alexei. This was indeed the issue. Just to clarify for posterity... I'm building the assembly dynamically using CSharpCodeProvider but I was not supplying the /d:TRACE switch in CompilerParameters.CompilerOptions. Consequently TRACE wasn't defined in the assembly and my calls to Trace were essentially being ignored. –  Jake Foster Jan 3 '13 at 19:03
    
Also, just to be clear, DEBUG and TRACE use identical plumbing and in fact use the same set of listeners (Debug.Listeners and Trace.Listeners point to the same TraceListenerCollection). The only difference between the two is that one looks for the DEBUG def and the other looks for the TRACE def. This allows you to specify different output for debug vs. release builds, for example, by having TRACE and DEBUG defined in your debug build but only TRACE on your release build. Note that VS debug builds define both switches by default. –  Jake Foster Jan 3 '13 at 19:06
    
@JakeFoster, very nice comments. Consider tweaking your question to match the finding as probably many people compiling code with CSharpCodeProvider forget about these defines (i.e. change title to something like "...compiled with CSharpCodeProvider" and add sentence or two about how assembly is created). Or I can make the changes at some point later and you can roll them back. –  Alexei Levenkov Jan 3 '13 at 19:22
    
Thanks for the reminder. Question updated. –  Jake Foster Jan 3 '13 at 19:40

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