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I am trying to create a macro that executes blocks of code only if it's a debug build. I've managed to make one that executes one line only if debug is enabled, but i cannot figure out how to do a whole block of code.

the one line macro is below:

#include <iostream>

//error checking
#if defined(DEBUG) | defined(_DEBUG)
    #ifndef DBG_ONLY
         #define DBG_ONLY(x) (x)            
    #endif
#else
    #ifndef DBG_ONLY
        #define DBG_ONLY(x) 
    #endif
#endif 



int main () {

    DBG_ONLY(std::cout << "yar" << std::endl);
    return 0;


}
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1  
I am not in a position to test code, but shouldn't your or operator be || rather than | –  EvilTeach Jan 3 '13 at 1:52
2  
@EvilTeach: normally, you use || rather than just |, but both work. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 3 '13 at 1:55
    
Thank you jonathan –  EvilTeach Jan 3 '13 at 1:56
1  
stackoverflow.com/questions/7372448/… This is a dupe, but i think purreals answer is better. –  EvilTeach Jan 3 '13 at 2:03
    
See the answer to C #define macro for debug printing. It is very closely related, though not identical. In particular, note the commentary about 'ensuring the code is always compiled' (even if it is not included in the object file). It is even more important with bigger blocks of code; they are more likely to be out of sync with their surroundings. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 3 '13 at 2:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Wrap the macro inside a do-while loop so that you avoid problems when using your macro in conditional statements such as if (cond) DBG_ONLY(i++; j--;). It also creates a new scope for debug only declarations:

#if defined(DEBUG) | defined(_DEBUG)
    #ifndef DBG_ONLY
      #define DBG_ONLY(x) do { x } while (0)         
    #endif
#else
    #ifndef DBG_ONLY
      #define DBG_ONLY(x) 
    #endif
#endif 

int main () {
    DBG_ONLY(
        std::cout << "yar" << std::endl;
        std::cout << "yar" << std::endl;
        std::cout << "yar" << std::endl;
        std::cout << "yar" << std::endl;
        );
    return 0;
}

This will fail if you have statements like int i,j. For that, we need a variadic macro I guess:

#if defined(DEBUG) | defined(_DEBUG)
    #ifndef DBG_ONLY
      #define DBG_ONLY(...) do { __VA_ARGS__; } while (0)
    #endif
#else
    #ifndef DBG_ONLY
      #define DBG_ONLY(...) 
    #endif
#endif 
share|improve this answer
2  
Does this work if the code block has a comma? –  Oli Charlesworth Jan 3 '13 at 1:39
    
Good catch, comma in function calls is OK –  perreal Jan 3 '13 at 1:41
2  
This also has the effect of creating a new inner scope, which may or may not be a good thing... –  Oli Charlesworth Jan 3 '13 at 1:57
1  
@EvilTeach: Hmm, that's a bit of an assumption. I have frequently added debug code that reports the number of times that a bit of code has been iterated through, for instance. That requires debug code "scattered" across a function. –  Oli Charlesworth Jan 3 '13 at 2:08
2  
Note that the #define DBG_ONLY(x...) notation is not standard C but a GCC extension. For standard C, you would probably use just #define DBG_ONLY(...) if (debugging) do { __VA_ARGS__; } while (0), where debugging is a constant that determines whether the debugging code is included. This will ensure that the compiler always checks the code (very important) but it will only be included in the object file when debugging evaluates to true. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 3 '13 at 2:15

If this is for "arbitrary" debug code (as opposed to strictly logging), then one crude option is a straightforward #if/#endif.

#if defined(DEBUG) | defined(_DEBUG)
    #define DBG_ONLY
#endif 

...    

#ifdef DBG_ONLY
    // Blah blah blah
#endif

This is definitely uglier than @perreal's solution, but it avoids any of the scoping issues, and works in all language variants (and any other issues we haven't yet thought about!).

It's also true that it's conditional code, and so has the possibility of getting badly out of sync (because it's not always checked by the compiler). But this is also true of the macro solution.

There is one other advantage; in a decent IDE (e.g. Eclipse CDT), your debug code will be highlighted differently.

share|improve this answer
    
i'd really rather not use preproccessor directives all over my code if possible –  r m Jan 3 '13 at 1:36
1  
Fair enough. Not sure why this is being down voted though, a macro is equivalent to a directive... –  Oli Charlesworth Jan 3 '13 at 1:39
    
@OliCharlesworth I think your objection is perfectly reasonable. Depends on the actual code, but I also think in practical problems #if / #endif should be preferred. Maybe you can edit your answer to make your intention clearer. –  Philipp Claßen Jan 3 '13 at 2:03
1  
Ya. I think your point is valid. –  EvilTeach Jan 3 '13 at 2:14
    
I think it was downvoted because (although your point was indeed valid) it didn't address the original question, instead bringing in a question of style. –  HerrJoebob Jan 3 '13 at 6:47

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