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I have to work with a csv file that is not directly useable for my needs of generating a simple chart. I need to manipulate the file into something "cleaner" and am running into issues and unsure if my overall strategy is correct, as I'm just learning to parse through files with ruby.... My issues here mainly related to me looking for data that is offset from where I've found or haven't found matches. After I find a line which meets criteria, I need to read info from 2 lines after it and manipulate some of it (move something from the last column to the second).

Here's the original csv file:

component
quantity header,design1,design2,design3,Ref,Units
quantity type,#,#,#,ref#,unit value
component
quantity header,design1,design2,design3,Ref,Units
quantity type,#,#,#,ref#,unit value
component
quantity header,design1,design2,design3,Ref,Units
quantity type,#,#,#,ref#,unit value

Desired output:

Component Header,Quantity type Header,Units Header,design1 header,design2 header,design3 header,Ref header
component,quantity type,unit value,#,#,#,n/a
component,quantity type,unit value,#,#,#,n/a
component,quantity type,unit value,#,#,#,n/a
component,quantity type,unit value,#,#,#,n/a
component,quantity type,unit value,#,#,#,n/a

My ruby script at the moment:

require 'csv'
f = File.new("sp.csv")
o = CSV.open('output.csv', 'w')

f.each_line do |l| #iterate through each line
    data = l.split
    if l !~ /,/ #if the line does not contain a comma it is a component
        o << [data,f.gets] #start writing data, f.gets skips next line but need to skip 2 and split the line to manipulate columns
    else
        o << ['comma'] #just me testing that I can find lines with commas
    end
end

f.gets skips the next line and the documentation isn't clear to me how to use it to skip 2. After that I THINK I can split that line by commas and manipulate row data with array[column]. Aside from this offset issue I'm also unsure if my general approach is a good strategy

EDIT

Here's some lines from the real file.... I'll work through the answers provided and see if I can make it all work. The idea I've had is to read and write line by line, vs. converting the whole file to an array and then reading and writing. My thought is that when these files get big, and they do, it'll take less memory doing it line by line.

THANKS for the help, I'll work through answers and get back to you.

DCB
Result Quantity,BL::BL,BL::BL_DCB-noHeat,DC1::DC1,DC2::DC2,noHS::noHS,20mmHS::20mmHS,Reference,Units
Avg Temperature,82.915,69.226,78.35,78.383,86.6,85.763,N/A,Celsius
RCB
Result Quantity,BL::BL,BL::BL_DCB-noHeat,DC1::DC1,DC2::DC2,noHS::noHS,20mmHS::20mmHS,Reference,Units
Avg Temperature,76.557,68.779,74.705,74.739,80.22,79.397,N/A,Celsius
Antenna
Result Quantity,BL::BL,BL::BL_DCB-noHeat,DC1::DC1,DC2::DC2,noHS::noHS,20mmHS::20mmHS,Reference,Units
Avg Temperature,69.988,65.045,69.203,69.238,73.567,72.777,N/A,Celsius
PCBA_fiberTray
Result Quantity,BL::BL,BL::BL_DCB-noHeat,DC1::DC1,DC2::DC2,noHS::noHS,20mmHS::20mmHS,Reference,Units
Avg Temperature,66.651,65.904,66.513,66.551,72.516,70.47,N/A,Celsius

EDIT 2

Using some regexp from answers below I developed a line by line strategy to parse through this. I'll post it as an answer for completeness.

Thanks for helping out and exposing me to methods to develop a solution

share|improve this question
    
Can you provide a more accurate example of the real CSV you're trying to read? The values given seem a bit... "cooked". –  the Tin Man Jan 3 '13 at 4:03

3 Answers 3

How about slicing it into groups of 3 lines:

File.read("sp.csv").split("\n").each_slice(3) do |slice|
  o << [slice[0], *slice[2].split(',')]
end
share|improve this answer
    
I like the sound of that... let me see where it takes me. Sometimes these files offset isn't 3, so maybe I can slice it based on search critera... Thanks –  twinturbotom Jan 3 '13 at 2:46

I created a CSV file based on the sample, called "test.csv".

Starting with this code:

data = File.readlines('test.csv').slice_before(/^component/)

I get an enumerator back. If I look at the data that enumerator will return I get:

pp data.to_a

[["component\n",
  "quantity header,design1,design2,design3,Ref,Units\n",
  "quantity type,#,#,#,ref#,unit value\n"],
["component\n",
  "quantity header,design1,design2,design3,Ref,Units\n",
  "quantity type,#,#,#,ref#,unit value\n"],
["component\n",
  "quantity header,design1,design2,design3,Ref,Units\n",
  "quantity type,#,#,#,ref#,unit value\n"]]

That's an array of arrays, broken into sub-arrays on the "component" line. I suspect the values aren't reflecting reality, but without a more accurate sample... well, GIGO.

If the "component" line isn't really a bunch of repeating "component" lines, and doesn't have any commas, you can use this instead:

data = File.readlines('test.csv').slice_before(/\A[^,]+\Z/)

or:

data = File.readlines('test.csv').slice_before(/^[^,]+$/)

The result will be the same with the current samples.

If you need a more complex regex you can substitute that, for instance:

/^(?:#{ Regexp.union(%w[component1 component2]).source })$/i

Which returns a pattern that will find any words in the %w[] array:

/^(?:component1|component2)$/i

From there we can walk the data array and clean out all the extraneous headers using:

data.map{ |a| a[2..-1] }.flatten

Which returns something like:

[
  "quantity type,#,#,#,ref#,unit value\n",
  "quantity type,#,#,#,ref#,unit value\n",
  "quantity type,#,#,#,ref#,unit value\n"
]

That can be iterated and passed to CSV to be parsed into arrays if needed:

data.map{ |a| a[2..-1].map{ |r| CSV.parse(r) }.flatten }

[
  ["quantity type", "#", "#", "#", "ref#", "unit value"],
  ["quantity type", "#", "#", "#", "ref#", "unit value"],
  ["quantity type", "#", "#", "#", "ref#", "unit value"]
]

That's all background to get you thinking how you can tear apart the CSV data.

Using this code:

data.flat_map { |ary|
  component = ary[0].strip
  ary[2..-1].map{ |a|
    data = CSV.parse(a).flatten
    [
      component,
      data.shift,
      data.pop,
      *data[0..-2]
    ]
  }
}

Returns:

[
  ["component", "quantity type", "unit value", "#", "#", "#"],
  ["component", "quantity type", "unit value", "#", "#", "#"],
  ["component", "quantity type", "unit value", "#", "#", "#"]
]

The only thing left to do is create the header you want to use, and pass the returned data back into CSV to let it generate the output file. You should be able to get there from here using the CSV documentation.


Edit:

Based on the actual data, here's a version of the code with a minor tweak, along with its output:

require 'csv'
require 'pp'

data = File.readlines('test.csv').slice_before(/^[^,]+$/)

pp data.flat_map { |ary|
  component = ary[0].strip
  ary[2..-1].map{ |a|
    record = CSV.parse(a).flatten
    [
      component,
      record.shift,
      record.pop,
      *record[0..-2]
    ]
  }
}

Which looks like:

[["DCB",
  "Avg Temperature",
  "Celsius",
  "82.915",
  "69.226",
  "78.35",
  "78.383",
  "86.6",
  "85.763"],
["RCB",
  "Avg Temperature",
  "Celsius",
  "76.557",
  "68.779",
  "74.705",
  "74.739",
  "80.22",
  "79.397"],
["Antenna",
  "Avg Temperature",
  "Celsius",
  "69.988",
  "65.045",
  "69.203",
  "69.238",
  "73.567",
  "72.777"],
["PCBA_fiberTray",
  "Avg Temperature",
  "Celsius",
  "66.651",
  "65.904",
  "66.513",
  "66.551",
  "72.516",
  "70.47"]]
share|improve this answer
    
This is very helpful, thank you. The only worry I have is that the entire file is being converted into an array. These files can get large and so the file and the array version of the file will be in memory. I'm wondering if there is a way to go line by line (read, find, write) vs. 1 huge array. May not be a big deal... I'll play with what you've provided more. THANKS! –  twinturbotom Jan 3 '13 at 13:25
    
Define "large". I work with GB-size files but most machines have multi-GB RAM these days. We don't want to use all of it but its there. –  the Tin Man Jan 3 '13 at 13:42
    
good point, I didn't think it would be an issue. This is extremely helpful for me! I'm going to learn from it, implement it, and check out answer! Thanks! –  twinturbotom Jan 3 '13 at 14:13
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Code I'm using which creates csv file with everything manipulated... Thanks to those that contributed some help.

require 'csv'

file_in = File.new('sp1.csv')
file_out = CSV.open('output.csv', 'w')

header = []
row = []


file_in.each_line do |line|

  case line
  when /^[^,]+$/ #Find a component (line with no comma)
    comp_header = file_in.gets.split(',') #header is after component and is split into an arry

    if header.empty? #header
      header.push("Component", comp_header[0], comp_header[-1].strip)
      comp_header[1..-3].each do |h|
        header.push(h)
      end
      file_out << header 

    end
    @comp = line.to_s.strip
    next
  when /,/ #when a row had commas
    puts @comp
    vals = line.split(',') #split up into vals array
    row.push(@comp, vals[0], vals[-1].strip) #add quantity and unit to row array
    vals[1..-3].each do |v| #for values (excluding quanity, units, reference info)
      row.push(v) #add values to row array
    end

  end
    file_out << row #write the current row to csv file
    row = [] #reset the row array to move on to the next component set

end
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