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Running the following code, will the browser ever fetch bar.png from the server (whether you see it or not)?

<html>
<body onLoad=myLoadFunc()>
<script>
function myLoadFunc() { document.getElementById("foo").innerHTML = ""; }
</script>
<div id="foo"> <img src="bar.png"/> </div>
</body>
</html>

The intention, by the way, is to show bar.png on browsers that don't run the script.

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@pst - you're allowed to edit your question, although I think it was right before. –  Malvolio Jan 3 '13 at 2:31
    
@OP If you just want to preload images, you can either use preloading in Javascript (e.g., pageresource.com/jscript/jpreload.htm), or even using only CSS and HTML (borislavdopudja.net/en/writings/css_preloading). –  bvukelic Jan 3 '13 at 2:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The answer is wholly adventitious. The browser is certainly allowed to start loading the image before it runs the script -- and I imagine it often will -- but there's nothing like a guarantee either way.

Consider using the <noscript> tag.

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1  
Why do you advise use of <noscript>? I've read on multiple occasions that it's actually not avisable. (e.g., javascript.about.com/od/reference/a/noscriptnomore.htm) –  bvukelic Jan 3 '13 at 2:35
1  
I advise considering it. The <noscript> tag does exactly what it does. A lot of people try to use it for things it won't work for (like catching cases where the script fails to execute, even though execution is enabled), but that's not really the tag's fault. I don't know exactly what the OP wants but if it's "load this image when scripting is turned off", that's exactly what <noscript> is good for. –  Malvolio Jan 3 '13 at 2:55
    
I don't know. Isn't it better to just remove it with JavaScript? –  bvukelic Jan 3 '13 at 3:07
    
If that fits the OP's goals, yes. It sounds like he's trying to keep the image server from being hit in the first place. –  Malvolio Jan 3 '13 at 3:10
    
Hm, your are right. In that case, I guess <noscript> should work better than any other solution. –  bvukelic Jan 3 '13 at 3:12

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